Tag Archives: conceptual

Carla Gannis, Brian L. Frye, Dmitry “Dima” Strakovsky & Tim Schneider | The Art Markets Are Present

The Art Markets Are Present

Carla Gannis, Brian L. Frye,Dmitry “Dima” Strakovsky & Tim Schneider

Thursday, August 25 | 7 pm

"Autoeroticomplete" is the title 2015, animated gif by Carla Gannis

“Autoeroticomplete” is the title
2015, animated gif by Carla Gannis

Special presentation discussing the intersection between art, technology, and business.  Followed by a panel discussion with the artists and writers.

Moderated by Lara Pan

Free Admission

About the Participants

Carla Gannis
www.carlagannis.com
@carlagannis

Carla GannisCarla Gannis identifies as a visual storyteller. With the use of 21st Century representational technologies she narrates through a “digital looking glass” where reflections on power, sexuality, marginalization, and agency emerge. She is fascinated by digital semiotics and the situation of identity in the blurring contexts of physical and virtual.


Gannis has also participated on numerous panels regarding intersections in art and technology including “Let’s Get Digital” at the Metropolitan Museum of Art and “Cogency in the Imaginarium” at Cooper Union and at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. In 2015 her speculative fiction was included in DEVOURING THE GREEN:: fear of a human planet: a cyborg / eco poetry anthology, published by Jaded Ibis Press.

Since 2003, Gannis’ work has appeared in over 20 solo exhibitions and numerous group exhibitions both nationally and internationally. Her most recent solo exhibitions include “A Subject Self-Defined” at TRANSFER Gallery, Brooklyn, NY and “The Garden of Emoji Delights” both at Real Art Ways, Hartford, CT and at The Hudson River Museum, Yonkers, NY. Features on her work have appeared in The Creators Project, The Huffington Post, Wired, Buzzfeed, FastCo, Hyperallergic, Art F City, Art Critical, The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, ARTnews,  and The LA Times, among others.


Brian Frye
http://ournixon.com/
@brianlfrye
Brian FryeBrian L. Frye is a filmmaker, writer, and professor of law. His films explore relationships between history, society, and cinema through archival and amateur images. In 2013, he produced the documentary Our Nixon, which was broadcast by CNN and opened theatrically nationwide.

Brian L. Frye is also Spears-Gilbert Associate Professor of Law at the University of Kentucky College of Law. He joined the faculty of the College of Law in 2012. He teaches classes in civil procedure, intellectual property, copyright, and nonprofit organizations, as well as a seminar on law and popular culture.

Brian’s films have been shown by The Whitney Museum, New York Film Festival, Pacific Film Archive, New York Underground Film Festival, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, The Warhol Museum, Media City and Images Festival. His films are in the permanent collection of The Whitney Museum. His writing on film has appeared in October, The New Republic, Film Comment and The Village Voice. A Professor of Law at the University of Kentucky, his legal scholarship concerns interactions between the law and the arts, focusing on issues relating to nonprofit organizations and intellectual property. Brian is a Creative Capital grantee and was named one of Filmmaker Magazine’s “25 New Faces of Independent Film” in 2012.

Dmitry “Dima” Strakovsky
www.shiftingplanes.org/
@dima_strakovsky

Dmitry "Dima" Strakovsky Dmitry “Dima” Strakovsky was born in St.Petersburg, Russia in 1976. He has lived in the United States since 1988. Dima completed his MFA degree at The School of the Art Institute of Chicago’s Department of Art and Technology and stayed in Chicago for several years producing art and working for various companies in the toy invention industry. He has been able to parlay this experience into a series of classes that deal with electro-mechanical fabrication and software development in the arts.

Dima’s work spans diverse media and conceptual interests. Collaborative performances, media installations, drawing and sculptural works are just some of the examples of different modalities that define his output. His work has been included in a variety of exhibitions and events at venues such as Tokyo National University of Fine Arts and Music, Moscow Biennale, Mediations Biennale (Poznan) and Indianapolis Museum of Contemporary Art.

Tim Schneider
www.thegray-market.com/about/
Tim Schneider
Tim Schneider is a an LA based freelance writer who primarily focuses on the intersection of art, tech, and business. He founded the blog The Gray Market in 2013. The Gray Market seeks to help fine artists, art dealers, and arts professionals build sustainable careers in an industry where economics are seldom discussed, best practices have yet to be developed, and technology is (finally) creating change.

Previously, he spent seven years in the Los Angeles gallery sector, primarily overseeing prominent private and corporate collections, as well as project-managing site-specific installations by leading blue-chip artists. While he continues writing, Schneider now also consults on diverse projects for dealers, artists, collectors, and startups, as well as providing expert testimony in legal matters on the inner workings of the art market. His first book, The Great Reframing: How Technology Will––and Won’t––Change Contemporary Art Sales Forever, will be completed later this year.

 

Conceived by Lara Pan

Contact: press@whiteboxny.org

Presented by WhiteBox
@WhiteBoxny
#WhiteBoxLab

 

In-between Program Series: Let the Bidding Begin & Sonic Sea

WhiteBox presents

In-between program series

Let the Bidding Begin & Sonic Sea

 

Tuesday, May 31 | 6 – 9pm

Let the Bidding Begin




 

Giovanna Olmos | Johan Wahlstrom | Li Guangming

Three act performance inspired from the current art market trends and political landscape.

Act I | 6pm
Untitled (How to sell a digital painting) conceived by Giovanna Olmos

Act II | 7pm
Per Square Inch is a staged art auction that artist Johan Wahlstrom imagined. For this performance he collaborates with artist Marina Markovic and actress Katie Apicella.

Act III | 8:30pm

Special performance by Li Guangming. Inspired by nature and Daoist thought Li Guangming will do a performance and the audience will be invited to bid per square foot.

Special thanks to Barbara and Ed Jr. from Stonewallfarms.net | Jeffersonville NY

Conceived by Lara Pan

Wednesday, June 1 | 7pm

Sonic Sea

A Film by the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC), Imaginary Forces (IF), International Fund for Animal Welfare (IFAW) and Diamond Docs.

Sonic Sea is a 60-minute documentary about the impact of industrial and military noise on whales and other marine life. It tells the story of Ken Balcomb, a former US Navy officer who solved a tragic mystery involving a mass stranding of whales in the Bahamas—and changed forever the way we understand our impact on the ocean. In the darkness of the sea, whales depend on sound to mate, find food, migrate, raise their young and defend against predators. But over the last century, human activity has transformed the oceanʼs delicate acoustic habitat, challenging the ability of whales and other marine life to prosper, and ultimately to survive. Sonic Sea offers solutions and hope for a quieter ocean, and underscores that the oceanʼs destiny is inextricably bound with our own. Sonic Sea is narrated by Rachel McAdams and features the musician, human rights and environmental activist, Sting, in addition to the renowned ocean experts Dr. Sylvia Earle, Dr. Paul Spong, Dr. Christopher Clark and Jean-Michel Cousteau. The film was produced by the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) and Imaginary Forces in association the with International Fund for Animal Welfare (IFAW) and Diamond Docs. Sonic Sea was directed and produced by Michelle Dougherty and Daniel Hinerfeld, written by Mark Monroe (The Cove, Racing Extinction) and scored by the Grammy-winning composer Heitor Pereira (Minions, Itʼs Complicated).

 

NYSCA     Department of Cultural Affairs NYC

On View Now | 585,000 m2 – History of the Jewish Quarter of Budapest A Mixed Media Exhibition

WhiteBox Presents In association with The Balassi Institute- Hungarian Cultural Center 585,000 m2 History of the Jewish Quarter of Budapest A Mixed Media Exhibition April 7-21, 2016 Wednesday through Sunday 11am – 6pm Participating Artists Zsuzsi Flóhr, Zsófia Szemző, Márton Szirmai,… Continue reading

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Ear to the Earth – GetTogether #1 “Jungle-Ized”

Date: Thursday March 31, at 7:30 Location: WhiteBox 329 Broome St Opening event of the new Ear to the Earth – GetTogether #1. Soundwalk Collective discusses Jungle-Ized, their upcoming project in Times Square and Francisco Lopez’s sound recording in South… Continue reading

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585,000 m2 – History of the Jewish Quarter of Budapest A Mixed Media Exhibition

585000_poster_lettersize_bwlogo

WhiteBox Presents
In association with The Balassi Institute- Hungarian Cultural Center

585,000 m2
History of the Jewish Quarter of Budapest
A Mixed Media Exhibition

April 7-21, 2016

OPENING – Thursday, April 7 | 6-8pm

Participating Artists
Zsuzsi Flóhr, Zsófia Szemző, Márton Szirmai, Dániel Halász, István Illés, Levente Csordás in collaboration with Miklós Mendrei and Benjamin Kalászi, Balázs Varjú Tóth, Mátyás Csiszár along with Csaba Kalotás (music) and Éva Szombat (photo).

 

585,000 m2 examines the symbolic spaces and the inscriptions of history -from the pre-World War 2 period to the present-found in the Jewish Quarter in the 7th district of Budapest, through visual art statements. The title is a reference to the massive surface area of the Quarter, a dense urban neighborhood overflowing with signifiers.

The curators invited nine young Hungarian artists to reflect upon particular buildings and discover the stories behind them, in their own artistic tone, using mostly visual media to mediate between past and present, history and art, artist and society. The conceptual installations and mixed media works operate as visual manifestos to alert the audience to both the history-defying existence of the Quarter itself, where Jews and non-Jews now once more converge, and the revival of cultural, religious, and social life rooted in the history of cohabitation before and after the Shoah.

The diversity of the Quarter is mirrored by the variegated techniques of the participating artists. Coming from different fields of contemporary arts, the most important intersection of the contributors is the Quarter itself, the space that beyond a geographical location operates as an irreducible excess. This excess contains the survival and revival of those marked for death but also the unquantifiable violence unleashed on the area and its inhabitants during World War 2, as well as, more recently, of the co-existence of traditional and experimental cultural life. Through the past decade the Quarter transformed itself and became the place that it is today, forming the identity of another generation of young Hungarians, among them the artists who now propose their statements, drawing on both cultural and personal memory.

Mixing archival and present-day frames with individual video installations, the exhibition invites the audience to step into the Quarter, to experience its bustling religious and cultural life and the artists’ transformative vision of this life. The video installations focus on individual buildings, their functions today, and on how the stories that can be told about them give rise to a vision of the Quarter. They also document, without looking away, the radical interventions to which it was subjected by the perpetrators of the Shoah, leaving an indelible mark on private and public spaces alike. Each installation provides a unique and idiosyncratic portrait of the spaces, showing the effects of time and how the present faces, accepts, and adopts the past.

Curated by:
Andrea Ausztrics, Historian and Media Artist
Zita Mara Vadász, Curator, Balassi Institute – Hungarian Cultural Center, New York

Contact:
press@whiteboxny
Presented by Balassi Institute – Hungarian Cultural Center and WhiteBox, in association with Tom Lantos Institute, the Consulate General of Hungary in New York, the Ministry for Foreign Affairs and Trade of Hungary, the Hungarian National Tourist Office in New York.

The programs of WhiteBox are made possible in part by the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs and New York State Council for the Arts

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JEAN PIERRE MULLER 7×7 : COLORBOX & A RED SHOW IN A

muller-red-wall-kaaba-s2

7×7 with ROBERT WYATT | ARCHIE SHEPP | NILE RODGERS | TERRY RILEY | SEAN O’HAGAN | MULATU ASTATKE | KASSIN
EXHIBITION – FEBRUARY 29th TO M ARCH 29th 2016
OPENING RECEPTION – SUNDAY MARCH 6th | 4-8PM
Music Performance @ WhiteBox | Archie Shepp March 29th
Live transmission | Archie Shepp MARCH 6th

Press

Night Flight, “Colorbox” and “A Red Show in A”: Jean Pierre Muller’s “7×7″ art project continues at WhiteBox on NYC’s Lower East Side By Bryan
Le Soir, Rendre Hommage à un Islam Tolérant, by Philippe Manche (March 15, 2016)
The Armory Arts Show, JEAN PIERRE MULLER 7X7 : COLORBOX & A RED SHOW IN A

ColorBox and A Red Show in A are the latest works to emerge from Jean Pierre Muller’s innovative 7×7 project. 7×7 is an inter-disciplinary collaboration between Belgian artist Muller and seven musical luminaries from a variety of contemporary genres; Nile Rodgers, Robert Wyatt, Mulatu Astatke, Archie Shepp, Sean O’Hagan, Kassin and Terry Riley. 7×7 is based on the simple principle that the seven colors of the rainbow correspond to the seven notes of the scale, the seven days of the week (and deities and planets associated with those days) and the seven chakras. Seven sound altarpieces have been created, in an edition of seven, each housing an original music by one of the seven composers. A is Red is Monday, Day of the Moon and of Diana (Robert Wyatt), B is Orange is Tuesday, Day of Mars (Archie Shepp), and so on.

In the summer of 2012, Muller created a full site-specific set for 7×7 at Edinburgh’s Summerhall: 7x7th Street. As its name suggests, this was actually a real street with billboards, signs, small houses, …

A year later, Jean Pierre Muller and Nile Rodgers created An Indigo Night in F at the same venue, an amazing show combining music, live painting and theatre. This acclaimed event was inspired by their collaboration on the 7×7-F-Indigo sound altarpiece.

For WhiteBox, Jean Pierre Muller will present two original shows related to 7×7: ColorBox on the main level and A Red show in A on the lower level.

ColorBox

Isaac Newton divided his color wheel in seven parts: red, orange, yellow, green, blue, indigo and violet. White is in the central part of the diagram, because all colors of light mixed together produce white. 7×7  at WhiteBox makes complete sense.

How can we embrace diversity in a world torn by the conflict between standardization and obsession for identity? Muller wishes to pen the color box and celebrate the full spectrum of our lives in their many contradictions. Rather than taking the stance of the artist as a moralist, he embarks us on a journey through the seas of complexity and the skies of hybridity.

Sometimes taking a sound panoramic view on things – drawing lessons from past history, digging into the origins of words, the meaning of symbols – sometimes zooming into our most intimate obsessions, Muller utters a multi-layered cry for life, plural yet deeply personal.

As much a painter as a printmaker, Jean Pierre Muller also uses light, sound and interactivity to make us feel the beat of the world, the rhythm of life. The elements that Jean Pierre uses in his art reflect processes of urban evolution and the way people become connected to each other through common experiences and references. Like streets grown organically over time, these elements interact through juxtaposition and ever increasing layers of complexity and history. They also tell many intertwined stories, much like the intertwined stories of people in a street, who may not know each other but are linked through commonality of space and time.

A Red Show in A

Jean Pierre, together with Robert Wyatt, one of music’s greatest shamans, has expanded and deepened the rich material used for their 7×7-Red-A sound altarpiece. It is a nostalgic salute to Al-Andalusia, when Spain was under Moorish rule and religions coexisted peacefully (at least, this is the way one can dream of it today, when everything concurs to convince us we’re at war with the others). The most powerful symbol of this period is the Alhambra palace in Granada. This golden age ended in 1492 with the Alhambra Decree and the expulsion of all the Jews from Spain. Al-Hamra  means the Red one, in Arabic…

For WhiteBox, the artist has built his own Alhambra, a red temple to house the 7×7-Red-A sound altarpiece, with meaningful columns and whispering walls (with voices by Robert Wyatt, but also Terry Riley, Archie Shepp and Nile Rodgers). Muller has adapted Kazimir Malevich’s emblematic paintings of the Black Square, the Black Circle and the Black Cross into a Red Star of David, a Red Crescent and a Red Cross. These are powerful symbols to initiate a new reflection on hybridity, coexistence, expulsion… and the power of symbols.

Following on from the success of 7x7th Street  and An Indigo Night in F  with Nile Rodgers, Spectrum  and A Red Show in A represent the next stage in a truly international project of ever-growing artistic ambition and cultural resonance.

 

www.7x7project.com

www.jpmuller.be

Jean Pierre Muller is a Belgian Neo-pop artist who makes vibrant assemblages using high and low forms and techniques. In his work, photography, drawing, silk-screen and painting come together and gestural and mechanical interventions meet. His collaborations with musicians offer an interactivity to his paintings, giving his audience new participatory ways of entering his world. Jean Pierre is committed to both his art practice and his role as head of the Printmaking Department at La Cambre, one of Belgium’s leading schools of art and design. His work has been shown at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Saragossa, the Hanover World Fair, the Royal Festival Hall and, latterly, Summerhall as part of the Edinburgh Festival.

Robert Wyatt was a founding member of the Soft Machine, who along with Pink Floyd helped to transform the late sixties psychedelic scene in the UK into something more lasting. In his long and distinguished solo career, he has been mixing simple and effective keyboard melody lines with poignant lyrics, often filled with personal and political references. He’s simply the most beautiful voice in English music (5 to 6 octaves of range, each octave is of a totally different character), and the long list of his collaborators includes Jimi Hendrix, Mike Oldfield, Brian Eno, Björk, David Gilmour or Paul Weller.

NYSCA     Department of Cultural Affairs NYC

Special Guest Performance – ISAAC ADEN – NIETZSCHE’S HORSE

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Special Guest Performance

ISAAC ADEN

NIETZSCHE’S HORSE

WITH ROB SHIPIRO AS FRIEDRICH NIETZSCHE

“On 3 January 1889, Nietzsche suffered a mental collapse. Two policemen approached him after he caused a public disturbance in the streets of Turin. What happened remains unknown, but an often-repeated tale from shortly after his death states that Nietzsche witnessed the flogging of a horse at the other end of the Piazza Carlo Alberto, ran to the horse, threw his arms up around its neck to protect it, and then collapsed to the ground.”[1]

ISAAC ADEN NIETZSCHE’S HORSE _8571

Press Contact : ISAAC.ADEN@GMAIL.COM

[1] Kaufmann 1974, p. 67.

GUEST PERFORMANCES – Isaac Aden & Jon Tsoi

Special Performance Event November 15th   5:30 ISAAC ADEN NIETZSCHE’S HORSE      WITH ROB SHIPIRO AS FRIEDRICH NIETZSCHE “On 3 January 1889, Nietzsche suffered a mental collapse. Two policemen approached him after he caused a public disturbance in the streets… Continue reading

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Ilija Šoškić : WBX at PERFORMA15 Maximum Energy – Minimum Time

Ilija Soskic WhiteBox Performa 15

WhiteBox at PERFORMA15 presents

Ilija Šoškić: INTERSECTIONS – Milk and Silk

(Homage to Mayakovsky and related actions)

FINAL PERFORMANCE

Maximum Energy – Minimum Time

Saturday, Nov. 21, 6pm-9pm

Free – waiting list sign up e-mail press@whiteboxny.org 
Send Email

Ilija Šoškić draws excerpts from past works–Conversation, Controversy, Arm-wrestling and Maximum Energy – Minimum Time–to be performed anew, reinterpreting those seminal actions within the context of the present.

The performance Maximum Energy – Minimum Time adapts its costuming commemorate the suicide of Vladimir Mayakovsky, a Russian Soviet poet. Dressed in a Red Army uniform, Šoškić performed Mayakovsky’s death, where he fashioned himself a soldier. Šoškić does not mourn Mayakovsky, nor does he create a martyr’s sage out of his “soldier’s death”. For him, Mayakovsky is here a vital figure, a true militant poet.

Image credit: Ilija Šoškić, Maximum Energy – Minimum Time, 1975; courtesy of the artist and White Box.

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Whitebox at SELECT Fair NY

Logo SELECT

Whitebox Art Center at SELECT Fair NY
May 13th -17th, 2015

General Hours
May 14 & 15 |  2 -10pm
May 16th | 12-10pm
May 17th | 12-6pm

Whitebox Art Center is pleased to present at SELECT Fair, Arial Allusions by Andriy Bazyuta featured on the rooftop with “You Are Here” Festival (aka The Maze ) and Ex of IN exhibition by Steven Holl in booth 206.

Arial Allusions | Andriy Bazyuta

Arial Allusions is an interactive, multilayered 3D dual projection work engaging visitors-as-participants through the use of ‘Kinect’ 3D sensors akin to a dendrological ideation. Beaming the moving audience from high up figure by figure will propel, in real time, the illusion of an amended architectural space where human sounds get converted into analogous geometrical images using as foil the ‘maze’ construct provided by Now You See Collective. Likewise, classic New York City rooftop elements such as the water tower, gazebos, retaining low walls, and the tar floor will become screening fields.

Figures entering the rooftop, upon coming in contact with sensors, will become active participants, their body shapes surrounded by an unlimited number of projected geometrical moving visual patterns caused by their transposed innate sounds. These sounds will be gleaned, processed, and visually mapped into constant oscillating images thrown upon various architectures surrounding the audience. The larger the crowd and the louder the sound propelled, the shakier the projected vibrating images will become, reaching a super saturated point turning into a sea of electrifying, rambling and shattering images.

Projections will be sourced from two asymmetrical perspective points. The one situated high up on the water tower will track and trap shifting bodies from above enclosing their figures into a single, vertiginously colored micro-environment which upon being approached by another body, the second low lying projector will, in synchronicity, linearly surround both images from its binary position in a dramatic overlap.

Ex of IN  | Steven Holl
Text of Yehuda Saffran.

Link to Steven Holl Architects

When geometry is no longer Euclidian we are thrown into a limitless world of the imagination. Conjugating cubic forms with spheres increases the infinite possibility to see some such configurations as a plastic reality. But a rational process does not guaranty the right ratio. Provided we are able to think, at the same time, that what we are seeing are not geometry but something else. These are some of the considerations we are obliged to entertain as we are engaged in the nature of the challenge posed to us in these experiments. These grouping and re-grouping of similar patterns is not a simple operation as it may appear. We are obliged to take the greatest care in employing harmonic ratios not only in a single form, but also in the relation of one form to each other, and it is this demand for the right ratio which could be in the centre of our conception of architecture, ultimately: “Una cosa mentale”.

Logo SELECT

Lit Lounge Sundays Salon > Stand Up Philosophy

2014.Step Not Beyond_Chairs_1

WhiteboxLab>Lit Lounge

presents

Stand Up Philosophy – Dejan Lukic

Step Not Beyond / Philosophical Therapeutics for the Lucid

A series of spring workshops on Hallucination
Sunday, March 29 | 3-5 pm
Sundays, April 12 & 26 | 3-5 pm

Donate to WhiteboxLab>Lit Lounge

An open and free workshop series focusing on themes central to art and culture. These enlightening lectures will teach you how to look at art with more confidence and an expanded vocabulary. They will speak about the role seduction plays in choosing what we like. A veritable “scholastic-oracular” presentation that is scholarly and enigmatic, rigorous and rarefied, where key terms in aesthetics are defined in a fluid and luminous language. The goal is to take essential experiences which became occluded in contemporary practice as purely practical matters that can be plugged into our lives to better inform our tastes. Inspiration is drawn from art, philosophy, architecture, and anthropology. The mediator, Dejan Lukic holds a Phd in anthropology from Columbia University and has lectured at numerous universities. For more details visit: www.stepnotbeyond.com

On Hallucination

Is it fair to say that superior works of art, literature, philosophy, film, etc., are some kinds of (precise and revelatory) hallucination? To what extent can we address reality itself as hallucinatory? On the other hand, what are the implications of sober hallucination, one that results neither from intoxication nor from any disorder? The Latin root of the term is hallucinari, meaning “gone astray in thought.” Hence, is it not ethically and aesthetically necessary to produce (in this world, our world, gone astray) a work that is equally out of bounds, wandering according to its own impulses? How else can reinvigorated sensations, ideas, and worlds emerge (if not during twilight and dawn)?

1081

Whitebox Art Center in collaboration with PAJ

PAJ 109 – Performance and Architecture Launch | March 1st  2pm – 4pm PAJ 109’s design portfolios were organized by landscape architect Cathryn Dwyre, who teaches at Pratt, and architect Chris Perry, head of graduate studies and director of the Geofutures… Continue reading

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PAJ 109 – Performance and Architecture

WhiteboxLab PAJ 109 - Performance and Architecture

Whitebox Art Center
in collaboration with PAJ

PAJ 109 – Performance and Architecture

PAJ 109’s design portfolios were organized by landscape architect Cathryn Dwyre, who teaches at Pratt, and architect Chris Perry, head of graduate studies and director of the Geofutures program at Rensselaer’s School of Architecture. They will speak about landscape and performance in the context of new directions in architecture and design practices. ­

Seth and Ariane Harrison of the design firm Harrison Atelier and ANAcycle architect Lydia Kallipoliti will also give presentations on their architectural projects in the greater New York City area.

The new PAJ 109 showcases ten architecture and design portfolios on installations, robotics,ecological projects, immersive environments and interview with Bernard Tschumi.

The event will be introduced by PAJ editor Bonnie Marranca

Link to introduction, “Expanded Fields: Architecture/Landscape/Performance” by Special issue editors and architects Cathryn Dwyre and Chris Perry

Link to PAJ Archive

WHITE VOX – The Resonance of Space

WhiteboxLab SoundLounge WhiteVox

WhiteboxLab > SoundLounge presents

WHITE VOX – The Resonance of Space
Multi-media sound and visual performance featuring NYU Steinhardt woodwind players

Saturday February 21st 2015 |  5:30pm to 7:30pm

This workshop and performance directed by NYU Faculty/Oboist, Matt Sullivan and painter, Ken Cro-Ken, will begin at sunset (5:34 PM EST) and end at “Astro Twilight Set” 7:06 PM.

NYU Steinhardt woodwind players will explore the sound of the unique urban-industrial architecture of Whitebox Art Center-street level space-utilizing the recorded sonic resonance of the planets in our solar system using as foil, a free improvisation to the works of Bach, Varese and other composers.

Following, there will be refreshments and a discussion and experimentation among participants and audience.

Underline : Recent Works by Judy Yang

Whitebox Art Center Joo Yeon Judy Yang

Whitebox Art Center presents

Underline: Recent Work by Judy Yang

On view February 4th to 24th 2015

Opening reception February 6th | 6-9pm

New York City – Underline is an exhibition presenting recent work by JooYeon Judy Yang, curated by Argentine curator Lucila Gradin. Judy Yang’s work arises from the artist’s own merging of visual traditions wrought from her East Asian lineage and Western experience, evoking coded landscapes and meticulously layered architectural renderings, taking influences from religious myth and social catastrophes, to talk about the political consequences of media manipulation.

In the exhibition there will be two bodies of work in dialogue. On one side Judy Yang will present three large-scale scraped boards from her series “Mistreatment of Life,” developed after the artist’s own first-hand experience of the 2010 foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) outbreak, after which Yang began to question the economy of food and health in our society. On the other side of the exhibition space, seven currency collages from the series “One Nation Banknote” will be displayed, recomposing the idealized iconography of real international currency to reveal an underlying narrative of social catastrophe.

These formally engaging, rigorous and labor-intensive works reference on one hand the vertical spaces and textured expanses of Asian scroll painting landscapes, while simultaneously calling to mind the heavily etched lines influenced by Western print masters.

This collection of pieces demands close examination: a slow, careful review akin to the study of evidence. Such a forensic visual investigation prompts the exploration of different approaches to morality through the highly detailed spaces of an East/West hybrid, filtered through the artist’s deft hand and careful, sensitive rendering.

The title of the show references the crawling television news ticker, which the artist interprets as the bearer of real information in the face of the distracting, manipulated spectacle of the images “breaking” on the screen.

Curated by Lucila Gradin

 Link to Press Kit

On Power and Secrecy | LitLounge Sundays Salon > Stand Up Philosophy

On Power and Secrecy Sundays, December 14 & 28 | 3pm – 5 pm Power: the capacity to act, an energetic principle. The most basic principle that denotes an ability to affect and to be affected by something or someone.… Continue reading

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CAVELLINI 1914 – 2014 A SURVEY, EVENTS, AND MAIL ART SHOW

whitebox art center and Cavellini and Ray Johnson

Whitebox Art Center
presents

CAVELLINI 1914 – 2014 A SURVEY, EVENTS AND MAIL ART SHOW

Exhibition on view November 1 – 30, 2014
Tuesday through Saturday | 11am to 6pm

Opening, Performances, and Poetry Readings
Honoring GAC. (Guglielmo Achille Cavellini)
Saturday, November 15 | 6 to 10pm

A survey exhibition of Cavellini’s artworks alongside a Mail-Art show exploring the themes of GAC / Cavellini, Ego and Self-Historification. Culled from Archives + Contemporary

Mail Art. Curated by Mark Bloch.

Link to Press Release

Performances by
Mark Bloch
William Evertson from Easthampton, Connecticut
Britta Wheeler as Belinda Powell
Pasha Radetzki from the Republic of Belarus
Giovanni and Renatta Strada from Ravenna, Italy
Jon Tsoi, Father of Blindfold Performance Art Medicine

Poetry by
Steve Dalachinsky | Bonny Finberg | Allan Graubard | Ron Kolm | Valery Oisteanu | Yuko Otomo | Jeffrey Cyphers Wright

Music by
Antonello Parisi (piano rhodes) with Michael Gam (bass) and Julieta Eugenio (tenor sax)

Video by
Guglielmo Achille Cavellini | Richard Kostelanetz
Galeazzo Nardini and the Italian Museum | Jennifer Weigel | and others

Cavellini Festival-Parallel Events

From Self-Historification to Selfies: A  GAC fest in New York City-
A celebration of the centenary 1914-2014 of Guglielmo Achille Cavellini
November 14 to 16 2014

Friday, November 14 | 5:30 – 7:30PM
Museum of Modern Art
Analog Network: Mail Art, 1960-1999
An exhibition charting the course of the vast underground international DIY (do it yourself) art by mail movement 1960-1999.

Saturday, November 15 | 12 – 2PM
Richard L. Feigen and Company
“Ray Johnson’s Art World” exhibition on view Nov. 7, 2014 – Jan. 16, 2015.

Saturday, November 15 | 3 – 5PM
LYNCH THAM Gallery
GUGLIELMO ACHILLE CAVELLINI / Centennial Exhibition
Works by Cavellini, music and performances

Sunday, November 16 | 9:30AM – 12PM
Katz Deli
New York Correspondence Brunch Meeting
in honor of Cavellini and Ray Johnson, Buster Cleveland, John Evans
and our other late New York mail artists.

Link to Mark Bloch

The programs of Whitebox Art Center are made possible in part by the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs and New York State Council on the Arts.

Whitebox Art Center DCA sponsor

 

LitLounge Sundays Salon > Stand Up Philosophy

whitebox Art Center LitLounge

WhiteboxLab>Lit Lounge
presents
 

Stand Up Philosophy – Dejan Lukic
Step Not Beyond / Philosophical Therapeutics for the Lucid

An open and free workshop series focusing on themes central to art and culture (desire, sensation, power). These enlightening lectures will teach you how to look at art with more confidence and an expanded vocabulary. They will speak about the role seduction plays in choosing what we like. A veritable “scholastic-oracular” presentation that is scholarly and enigmatic, rigorous and rarefied, where key terms in aesthetics are defined in a fluid and luminous language. The goal is to take essential experiences which became occluded in contemporary practice as purely practical matters that can be plugged into our lives to better inform our tastes. Inspiration is drawn from art, philosophy, architecture, and anthropology. The mediator, Dejan Lukic holds a Phd in anthropology from Columbia University and has lectured at numerous universities. For more details visit: www.stepnotbeyond.com

Donate to Whitebox Art Center

On Desire

Thursdays, October 9, 16, 23, 30 |  7pm – 9 pm

There is a “thrust” which determines our strongest feelings of being alive. With it, a simple but difficult question arises: what is desire? An impulse that drives us toward what we lack or a force that constantly derails us and throws us off track? What are its economies, politics, and aesthetics? Can this “hunger,” as a set of inclinations, be trained? And if life itself is a constant outpouring why do we create boundaries for ourselves?

On Sensation

Sundays, November 16 & 30 | 3pm – 5 pm

Art produces sensation and in this respect connects us to what we call “life.” But more importantly, what are the unforeseen sensations, why do they matter, how do they intervene within our daily life, how do they make it extraordinary? How do individual authors construct impersonal sensations (through what vulnerabilities)? And finally, what kind of perception, awareness, and furor does every new sensation open?

On Power and Secrecy

Sundays, December 14 & 28 | 3pm – 5 pm

Power: the capacity to act, an energetic principle. The most basic principle that denotes an ability to affect and to be affected by something or someone. One writer says that secrecy is at the core of power. But how do we define power? How many different types and experiences of power are there (being overpowered, empowered, in resistance, in domination, etc.)? How does secrecy harness its own power? Public or private: which contains a more vigorous degree of empowerment? And which is healthier: the crude power of the institution (megapower) or the ephemeral power of the fugitive (micropower)?

 

The programs of Whitebox Art Center are made possible in part by the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs.

Whitebox Art Center DCA sponsor
 

R. B. Schlather: Opera: Alcina

Photograph by Matthu Placek

WhiteboxLab>Sound Lounge
presents

R. B. SCHLATHER: OPERA: ALCINA George Frideric Handel, 1735

Open rehearsals | September 6-17th
Free and open to the public daily except for Thursdays | 11am-6pm

General Rehearsal | September 19th | 7pm
Performances | September 20th & 21st | 7pm
Talk back after performance on September 21st

SUGGESTED DONATION TICKETING FOR RESERVATIONS TO GENERAL REHEARSAL 9/19 AND FINAL PERFORMANCES 9/20-9/21

PRODUCTION TEAM

Music Director | Geoffrey McDonald
Stage Director | R. B. Schlather
Costume | Terese Wadden
Scenography | Paul Tate DePoo
Lighting Design | JAX Messenger
Hair and Makeup Design | Dave Bova
Titles | Steven Jude Tietjen
Stage Manager | Audrey Chait
Interactive Media Design | Igor Molochevski
Assistant Director | Emily Cuk

CAST
Alcina | Katharina Hagopian
Ruggiero | Jamie Van Eyck
Morgana | Anne- Carolyn Bird
Bradamante | Eve Gigliotti
Oronte | Samuel Levine
Melisso | David Adam Moore

ORCHESTRA
Harpsichord | Elliot Figg
Oboe | Ellen Hindson
Violin | Johanna Novom
Oboe | Kristin Olson
Cello | Katie Rietman
Viola | Elizabeth Weinfield
Bass | Wen Yang
Violin | Jude Ziliak

Press

New York Times, A Sorceress Stirs Up a Sense of Adventurousness by Zachary Woolfe

Huffington Post, The Rumors of Opera’s Death Have Been Greatly Exaggerated (Pt. 2) by Jennifer Rivera

Frankfurter Allfemeine Blog, Im weißen Zauberschuhkarton steckt die Zukunft der Oper by Patrick Bahners

Parterre Box, About Last Night by John Yohalem

IMBY (In My Backyard), Hudson’s Schlather Directs Handel’s “Alcina” in New York by John Issacs

IMBY (In My Backyard), Open house: Opera at Whitebox > SoundLounge by Whitebox Art Center

Press Release

New York City – Whitebox Art Center is pleased to present the work of opera director R. B. Schlather as part of WhiteboxLab>Sound Lounge, a series of unconventional works. For two weeks, Whitebox’s main exhibition space will be a laboratory for the rehearsal and performance of an operatic score, culminating in two performances of George Frideric Handel’s Alcina, an 18th century baroque opera. This theatric installation uses the opera seria, or “serious opera”, Alcina (1735) as source material. The libretto, L’Isola d’Alcina (1728) is by Riccardo Broschi, based off of Ludovico Ariosto’s epic poem Orlando Furioso. Alcina is a story of love and illusion that premiered during Handel’s remarkable hit season at the Covent Garden Theatre in London in 1735, and is regarded as one of his most inventive and melodic musical scores.

WhiteboxLab>Sound Lounge and R. B. Schlather respond to the changing landscape of operatic performance in New York City and around the world by staging this work in an untraditional opera venue. As a laboratory, WhiteboxLab>Sound Lounge is delighted to open all musical and staging rehearsals, September 6 – 17, prior to the General Rehearsal on September 19th at 7pm and the final productions on September 20th and 21st at 7pm, with a Talkback after the performance on the 21st moderated by Joseph Cermatori. This program will be free and open to the public daily, except for Thursdays, from 11am to 6pm. For the final performances, the opera will be enacted live with an orchestra, in Italian, utilizing new technologies with projected English subtitles.

The opera is set on the island of the enchantress Alcina, and explores themes of identity, illusion, and transformation. This island exists as a beautiful landscape in the middle of the ocean, where Alcina culls her powers to create a paradise, only to lure and seduce the knights that wash up on her shore, one of whom is the heroic Ruggiero. Alcina’s magic causes Ruggiero to fall under her spell and, in doing so, he forsakes his duty as a knight and forgets his fiancée, Bradamante. The opera develops as Bradamante disguises herself as a male warrior her brother “Ricciardo” and sets out on a mission to recover her love.

Accompanied by Alcina’s guardian, Melisso, the two are shipwrecked on Alcina’s island by fate. Imminent danger awaits Ruggiero, as Alcina possesses the power to transform her foes and lovers of whom she tires into rocks, trees, and wild beasts. The already heavily dramatized plot is further complicated by the integration of different characters who all, in their own right, act on emotions of love and jealousy. In portraying Alcina’s thickened plot, Schlather’s production brings to life a story of enchantment, folding into it classic operatic moments of romance, betrayal, violence, unrequited love, and magic.

R. B. Schlather is an opera director based in Manhattan, NY. Schlather’s recent credits include Werther for Opera Company Brooklyn, Treemonisha for New York City Opera, and Some Call Refuge at Vaudeville Park. Additionally, Schlather has directed The Arianna Project for lauded early music group Musica Nuova, a concert with Nico Muhly and Gotham Chamber Opera at the multimedia art cabaret (le) Poisson Rouge . He is also accredited for I. Were., a pastiche created with countertenor Anthony Roth Costanzo and dramaturge Joe Cermatori for the Salon/Sanctuary Concerts. He regularly assists Christopher Alden, most recently at the Los Angeles Philharmonic, Boston Lyric Opera, English National Opera salon and sanctuary concert, New York City Opera, and the Canadian Opera Company. He has assisted Kevin Newbury at Bard Summerscape and Central City Opera. In the near future, Schlather will be directing opera productions at Tanglewood Music Festival and at the Gran Teatre del Liceu, Barcelona.

R. B. Schlather’s production is part of Whitebox’s new program, WhiteboxLab>Sound Lounge, which aims to create sustained and in-depth exposure for artists working in temporal mediums such as performance, sound art, and literary arts, while providing a platform for audiences to experience artist practices.

Synopsis: The sorceress Alcina lives on an island in the ocean, and enchants the knights that arrive on her shores. When tired of her lovers she transforms them into rocks, trees and wild beasts. The heroic knight Ruggiero has fallen under her spell, and forgotten his fiancée, Bradamante. Bradamante, in male disguise as her brother “Ricciardo,” has set out with her guardian, Melisso, to recover Ruggiero, and the two are shipwrecked on Alcinaʼs island by fate. There they encounter Alcinaʼs flighty sorceress sister, Morgana, who instantly falls in love with “Ricciardo.” They discover Ruggiero in Alcinaʼs embrace, with no memory of his betrothal. He angrily rebukes “Ricciardo” as competing for Alcinaʼs affections. Alcinaʼs general, Oronte, in love with Morgana and stung by her sudden infatuation with “Riccairdo”, arrives to challenge “him” to a duel. This dramatic scenario of identities and transformations plays out until the source of Alcinaʼs magic power is broken, and all, including Alcinaʼs transfigured lovers, are returned to human shape and sanity.

R. B. Schlather 2014

This opera is made possible by Felicia Blum, Allen R. & Judy Brick Freedman, Stephanie French and Charles Klein, Sherwin M. Goldman, Nancy Henriksson, Graham and Susan McDonald, Roy Niederhoffer, Nowick Taylor Trust, The Alfred & Jane Ross Foundation and Karen R. Schlather

Press Contact: press@whiteboxny.org

Twitter: @davidadammoore @slevinesinger

The programs of Whitebox Art Center are made possible in part by the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs.

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CLICK CLICK CLICK: Screening

Whitebox_CLICKCLICKCLICK 2014_Sabrina Ratté

 Whitebox Art Center presents

Click. Click. Click. Copy. Paste. Drag. Drop. These are the new gestures of digital image making. Click Click Click is a survey of contemporary digital moving image practices that span GIFs, augmented performances, green screen keying, collage, appropriation, Processing, 3D renders and more.

Artists in the screening: Morehshin Allahyari, Claudia Bitran, Hannah Black, Gaby Cepeda and Adriana Minoliti, Jennifer Chan, Jennie Cole, Claire Evans, Dafna Ganani, Geraldine Juárez, Nicole Killian, Claudia Maté, Raquel Meyers, Lorna Mills, Eva Papamargariti, Sabrina Ratté, Tessa Siddle, Giselle Zatonyl

Nicole Killian, Move It, 2013, 30 sec.

Move It is an excerpt from an ongoing investigation into getting the crowd pumped up and moving.

Lorna Mills, Jump Rope, 2011, GIF

Lorna Mills channels and trolls the internet through her assemblage GIFs. Searching the far reaching corners of the world wide web, Mills pulls out the most peculiar, inane, and baffling imagery and then recontextualizes it into her own carefully crafted compositions.

Claudia Bitran, The Zone: Action, 2013, 3:17 min

The Zone is a series of three trailers for movies that do not exist: a Korean horror film, a Latino action film, and a French drama film. In the Latino action trailer, I perform as Macarena de las Heras, a strong and determined woman who has to go through different adventures in order to enter “The Zone.” She rides motorcycles, fights gangsters, tries to get information from the gatas, and shoots guns while running through the desert and making out with hot guys.

Gaby Cepeda and Adriana Minoliti, Conspirativas (series), 2013, GIF

These collaborative images capture an intersection between the artists’ loving interrogations of celebrity culture (Cepeda) and pornography (Minoliti). The result is an image that tackles female sexuality in its vicissitudes.

Claudia Maté, Fill Shapes, 2012, 1:54 min.

Fill Shapes uses Processing and After Effects to make squares and circles dance across the screen in this brightly colored geometric fantasy.

Lorna Mills, Garden Variety (series), 2013, GIF

Lorna Mills, Stress Relief, 2011, GIF

Eva Papamargariti, RandomAccessData, 2014, 4:50 min.

RandomAccessData is a parallel visual and verbal narration between references; it is a stream of information that creates a tag cloud based on random thoughts about post- internet art, radical utopian groups of the ’60s, today’s virtual field, the definitive role of searching and tagging inside the cyberspace, terms like distribution and reproduction of image, constant data flow, internet immersion, real ID vs cyber ID and the notion of auto generated content.

Dafna Ganani, I Dream of I Dream of Jennie, 2013, 3:42 min.

I Dream of I Dream of Jennie is a mediated performance by the artist Dafna Ganani. It references the 70’s American TV series I Dream of Jeannie and uses glitched images of copyrights licenses, biopunked Barbara Eden in her Jeannie costume, dolphins, BIOS homepage to propose a cybernetics fantasy: beings with both organic and cybernetic parts.

Gaby Cepeda and Adriana Minoliti, Conspirativas (series), 2013, GIFs

Hannah Black, Intensive Care/Hot New Track, 2013, 5:36 min

Remixed fragments of what’s allowed to appear on the surface of the world: Rihanna/Chris Brown, US/Iraq, blackness/whiteness, pain/pleasure, money/body. “Love and shame are the theory and the practice.”

Lorna Mills, Garden Variety (series), 2013, GIF

Geraldine Juárez, Love Not Money, 2009, 1:06 min

In 2009, months after the stock market meltdown, i created a personal stock market to track my assets: desires, work, routines, expectations and emotions – and how the way i valued them felt closer to death, money or love.

The video is the output of four weeks of emotional capitalism, where my assets were collected in a notebook and mapped and visualized originally in Processing.

Claire Evans, Digital Decay: Meditation/Disintegration, 2011, 1:50 min

Meditation/Disintegration is an animation of individual video frames saved in incrementally lower file formats hundreds and hundreds of times. Where is the line at which compression ceases to preserve information entirely? The digital image washes away on the tide of its own preservation. The beach ball is the third eye.

Lorna Mills, Splode (series), 2012, GIF

Morehshin Allahyari, The Romantic Self-Exiles I, 2012, 5:06 min.

To build a land; an imaginary home. To push the limits of real and unreal, memory and imagination, locality and universality. To put together my most vivid memories on flat planes or 3D cubes. Inside and outside the empty rooms, rooms without bodies, rooms left behind. A reflection and presentation of emotional attachments. Collective and personal.

Jennie Cole, a device of a special type, 2012, 3:32 min.

a device of special type investigates encounters with text in electronic media, in response to Donna Haraway’s assertion that writing is ‘pre-eminently the technology of cyborgs’. Exploring ideas of transhumanist possibility alongside the manipulations of identity suggested by the internet’s corporate ‘like’, the language in this video is at once page-based, screen-based, illuminated and infiltrated by symbols and logos.

Lorna Mills, Garden Variety (series), 2013, GIFs

Tessa Siddle, Hexenhaus, 2010, 2:47 min.

Hexenhaus is a video fragment from a series of work about domestic ritual and relations between humans, houseplants, and animals. Following the collapse of a relationship a failed banishing ritual is performed with my pet houseplants/familiars. An attempt to convert loneliness into solitude results in only more loneliness.

Nicole Killian, Attention, 2013, 2:53 min.

Attention is a video exploring mall madness and meditation.

Gaby Cepeda and Adriana Minoliti, Conspirativas (series), 2013, GIFs

Giselle Zatonyl, The Harm of Coming into Existence, 2014, 1:57 min.

Zatonyl’s 3D rendered video juxtaposes glittery, soft colors with hard lines forming an imaginative factoy-like space that produces unknown, but assuredly delightful things.

Jennifer Chan, Boyfriend 男友 [Nanyou], 2014, 6:27 min.

BOYFRIEND combines YouTube-captured webcam videos with images of dominant East Asian masculinity. Headlined by a Mandarin cover of Justin Bieber’s pop hit Boyfriend, K-pop stars, J-pop stars, Taiwanese diaspora, and Canto-pop icons, are recut against confessional Asian American “dudes” to deliberate the superficial aspects of performing the archetypal romantic straight male partner in Asian culture.

Lorna Mills, Linguine Primavera, 2013, GIF

Lorna Mills, Kitty Fire, 2011, GIF

Raquel Meyers, 2SLEEP1 ❚❚❚❚❚❚❚ 002. MATSAMÖT, 2013, 3:23 min.

Matsamöt is part of 2SLEEP1, a playlist of audiovisual performances in text mode, designed to make you fall asleep. The music interface and the graphics are built up from text symbols (PETSCII). Made by Raquel Meyers and Goto80 using c-64.

Sabrina Ratté, The Land Behind, 2013, 4:56 min.

Traveling on an undefined territory where the illusion of a continuous tracking shot emphasizes an unreachable destination. Through the syncopated editing and multiple transitions, images of the area themselves become traveling entities, creating confusion on the level of the depicted space as much as with the level of its temporality.

Photo caption : Still from Sabrina Ratté’s The Land Behind, 2013, 4:56 min.

 

Whitebox Art Center DCA sponsor

Coded After Lovelace

Claudia Hart's "Caress"

Whitebox Art Center presents

Coded After Lovelace

Curated by Faith Holland & Nora O’ Murchú

Exhibition on view August 14th – September 2nd 2014
Opening reception Thursday August 14th  | 6-8pm

Carla Gannis | Claudia Hart | Olia Lialina | Jillian Mayer | Rosa Menkman | Arleen Schloss | Lillian F Schwartz

Press

Hyperallergic, Tracing a Lineage of Tech-Minded Women Artists by Jillian Steinhauer

Riposte Magazine, Coded After Lovelace by Emma Tucker

Mandy Machine, All of Piece; Maria Lassnig and Coded After Lovelace by Mandy Morrison

New York City – Coded After Lovelace offers a survey of art that critically reflects on the creative use of technology: its developments and limitations. From the room-sized computers of the Bell Labs era to the tablet-based work of today, these seven artists question the boundary between art and technology. Coded After Lovelace creates a new lineage across artists of different generations.

Link to full press release

Press Contact: press@whiteboxny.org

Whitebox Art Center DCA sponsor

NO EXIT : A Project by Khaled Jarrar

Still from Khaled Jarrar's "I. Soldier"

Whitebox Art Center Presents

NO EXIT
A Project by Khaled Jarrar
On View July 24th – August 9th (extended)

Opening reception at Whitebox Art Center July 24th 5 – 7 pm

Link to images and press packet 

New York City – Whitebox Art Center presents a solo show by Palestinian artist Khaled Jarrar, produced and curated by Myriam Vanneschi.

The Israel Border Police denied artist Khaled Jarrar exit to travel to NYC for this project and his participation in the show Here and Elsewhere at the New Museum. He has since decided to create a new work for this show that deals with his status as well as the current situation in Gaza. This new media piece will be live updated as the situation develops.

Khaled Jarrar describes his experience attempting to leave Palestine on July 23rd, 2014: “Another massacre is taking place in Gaza, and Israel is trying to sell it as a war with Hamas using a deceptive media campaign, turning the oppressed into a villain. It is a fact that Israel is an occupying and apartheid country that controls our land, steals our water and natural resources, depriving us of our basic human rights for the past 66 years. The Israeli recurrent massacres will never end. Telling and sharing our stories and what is happening in Palestine is very essential. We are obliged to take the streets and strongly condemn the killing of the people of Gaza”.

NO EXIT is produced and curated by Myriam Vanneschi and co-produced by Igor Molochevski.
The programs of Whitebox Art Center are made possible in part by the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs.

Press Contact: press@whiteboxny.org

Links to Press:

ArtFCity: Weighing Risks After Last Weeks Cancelled Pro-Palestine Workshop by Whitney Kimball

WNYC RADIO: Art That Reaches Beyond Palestine by Deborah Solomon & Gisele Regatao

Hyperallergic: The Real Life Politics of Palestinian Art in New York by Hrag Vartanian

Artnet News: Pro-Palestine Exhibition Cancelled in NYC by Ben Davis

Hyperallergic: Israel Denies Exit for Palestinian Artist In New Museum Show by Myriam Vanneschi

Le Monde: Khaled Jarrar, artiste et militaire palestinien, n’ira pas à New York by Robin Braquet

Animal New York: Israel Denies Exit Palestinian Artist Bars Attending His New Museum Show by Marina Galperina

ArtNews: No Exit for Palestinian Artist Khaled Jarrar

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Narcistecture

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Whitebox Art Center presents

Narcistecture
New Photographs by Klaus Pichler

Opening reception Friday June 13th | 6-8pm
Exhibition on view June 13th – July 7th 2014

Curated by Carolina Sandretto and Tony Guerrero

This exhibition is made possible by US Austrian Chamber of Commerce.
Whitebox Art Center extends a special thank you to Duggal Visual Solutions.
The programs of Whitebox Art Center are made possible in part by the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs.

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Klaus Lutz – Film Screening 

2014_WhiteboxArtCenter_DadaonTour_Klaus_Luntz_Pressimage

Presented by Zürich Meets New York: A Festival of Swiss Ingenuity

in partnership with the Estate of Kaus Lutz, Rotwand Gallery Zürich, and Whitebox Art Center

Klaus Lutz Film Screening

Sunday May 18th 2014 | 4-5:30pm

Swiss-born artist and filmmaker Klaus Lutz, who died in New York in 2009, left a remarkable body of work, characterized by a unique cinematic vision. Shot in 16mm and using animation and multiple exposures, his films are reminiscent of those of Georges Méliès and the 1920s avant-garde, yet they create a universe of their own. Enjoy a selection of his most iconic films, spectacularly projected on a large balloon.

Free admission

RSVP: ZHNY.eventbrite.com 

Reception to follow

Zürich Meets New York: A Festival of Swiss Ingenuity, May 16-23, 2014, highlights the contemporary relevance of visionary movements and ideas born in Zurich and their impact on American culture. Building on the upcoming 100th anniversary of the Dada movement and Zurich’s role as a 21st-century hub for artistic and scientific innovation, the festival features 25 events at venues across the city, and is presented by the Consulate General of Switzerland in New York, the City of Zurich, ETH Zurich and the University of Zurich (UZH).

Link to Klaus Lutz Film Screening

Caption : “Klaus Lutz In the Universe”, Museum Haus Konstruktiv (installation view), 2012 . Photo: Stefan Altenburger

ZurichMeetsNewYork_Horizontal

Dada on Tour

Whitebox Art Center

Presented by Zürich Meets New York: A Festival of Swiss Ingenuity

in partnership with Dada 100 Zurich 2016, Cabaret Voltaire in Zürich, and Whitebox Art Center

Dada on Tour

On view May 18th through 22nd 2014
Opening celebration Sunday May 18th | 11 – 6pm

Jean Arp | Hugo Ball | André Breton | Marcel Duchamp | Baroness Elsa von Freytag-Loringhoven | Francis Picabia | Sophie Taeuber-Arp | Tristan Tzara | and others

Born at Zurich’s Cabaret Voltaire in 1916, the Dada movement quickly spread to cities such as New York, Berlin and Paris. Enter a “nomadic” tent and discover the visions, actions, scandals and love stories of 165 Dadaists: Jean Arp, Hugo Ball, André Breton, Marcel Duchamp, Baroness Elsa von Freytag-Loringhoven, Francis Picabia, Sophie Taeuber-Arp and Tristan Tzara, among others. The multimedia installation features the “Starry Heaven of Dada,” mapping the journey of this international art movement from 1916 to 1923.

Zürich Meets New York: A Festival of Swiss Ingenuity, May 16-23, 2014, highlights the contemporary relevance of visionary movements and ideas born in Zurich and their impact on American culture. Building on the upcoming 100th anniversary of the Dada movement and Zurich’s role as a 21st-century hub for artistic and scientific innovation, the festival features 25 events at venues across the city, and is presented by the Consulate General of Switzerland in New York, the City of Zurich, ETH Zurich and the University of Zurich (UZH).

Free admission

link to Dada On Tour

Caption : Schweizerisches Literaturarchiv (SLA), Bern. Estate Hugo Ball/ Emmy Hennings

How Green Was My Valley – Artist talk

Whitebox Art Center

Center for Palestine Studies, Alwan for the Arts, ArtPalestine International and Whitebox Art Center present

How Green Was My Valley – Artist talk
Due to technical difficulties, the talk has been moved from Alwan For The Arts to Whitebox Art Center

Friday April 4th | 7:30pm
Joseph Audeh, Samira Badran & Mary Tuma | Moderated by Dr. Raouf J. Halaby

Free and open to the public
- Doors open at 6:30pm

Link to exhibition and press release
Link to Reading and Performance event
Link to Dr. Raouf J. Halaby’s article on Counter Punch

Joseph Audeh
(b. 1989, Sarasota, Florida)

Joseph Audeh currently lives and works in New York. His work engages architecture, environmental change, and technology. His various projects imagine solutions to meet future energy needs by combining old forms of environmental knowledge with breakthroughs in emerging technology. Audeh was selected as a Berkeley Design Fellow (2011), a finalist for the Frieze Writer’s Prize (2012), and a traveling artist for the River Has Two Banks at Makan Art Space, Amman (2012). He recently completed an artist residency at Townhouse Gallery, Cairo (2013).

Samira Badran
(b. 1954, Libya)

Samira Badran was born to Palestinian parents in Tripoli, Libya and currently lives and works in Barcelona. Her father, Islamic artist Jamal Badran influenced her practice, which uses a wide range of mediums including painting, collage, photography, and installation. She has exhibited at the Sharjah Biennial, Al Hoash—the Palestinian Art Court in Jerusalem, The UNESCO Palace in Paris, The Modern Art Gallery in Baghdad, the Jordanian National Gallery of Fine Arts in Amman, the Washington Museum of Women in the Arts, Musèe du Luxembourg, Paris, Centro Internazionale Multimedia, Italy, Gemeetemuseum den Haag, Foreign Ministry of Berlin, Al-Ma’mal Foundation, Jerusalem and Espai Agora, Barcelona.

Mary Tuma
(b. 1961, Oakland)

Mary Tuma was born in California in 1961 to a native Californian mother of Irish descent and a Palestinian father. She currently lives and works in Charlotte, North Carolina. She began sewing and crocheting with her mother at an early age. Her love of these processes led her to begin her formal study of art as an apprentice at Beautiful Arts Hall in Kerdassa, Egypt, where she learned to weave tapestries. Tuma’s work has been shown, nationally and internationally, in such venues as the Crocker Art Museum, The Maruki Gallery in Hiroshima, The Southeastern Center for Contemporary Art, Al-Kahf Gallery in Bethlehem, The Cheongju International Craft Biennial, the Station Museum in Houston and Contemporary Projects in Kuwait City. Her work has appeared in Contemporary Practices, Art in America, Dar Al-Hayat, The New York Times, The Christian Science Monitor, Counterpunch, NYArts, Mother Jones,The San Francisco Chronicle and The Jordan Star, among others.

Moderator – Raouf J. Halaby
(b. 1945, Jerusalem)

Raouf J. Halaby is a native of Jerusalem, Palestine. In 1959 he moved from Upper Bakaa to Beirut, Lebanon and graduated with honors from the National Protestant Secondary School in 1964. He was awarded a Bachelor and Master’s degrees from Ouachita Baptist University, and his Ed.D. in the College Teaching of English from Texas A&M University in 1973. He studied Art History in Rome, Italy.

Since 1973, he has been teaching at his alma mater and is in his 41st year as a Professor of English and Art. Halaby has served on national, regional and local boards, as a consultant for University of Minnesota’s Immigration History Research center. He is a widely-published author, a regular contributor to CounterPunch, a photographer, and an award-winning sculptor, whose works have been exhibited nationally. He is a peace activist dedicated to the cause of Palestine and her dispossessed people.

Thank you to the co-sponsors of the Artist Talk

Center for Palestine Studies, Alwan for the Arts, ArtPalestine International

alwan logo final 10-2013   cps logo blue (3)   ArtPalestineInternational_logo

How Green Was My Valley – Opening Celebration

Whitebox Art Center

ArtPalestine International and Whitebox Art Center present

How Green Was My Valley

On view April 3rd – 27th 2014
Opening celebration Thursday April 3rd | 6-8 pm
Readings and Performance Thursday April 10th | 5-7:30pm

Link to exhibition and press release
Link to Reading and Performance event

Mohamed Abusal | Tarek Al Ghoussein | Mohammed Al Hawajri | Joseph Audeh
Samira Badran | Taysir Batniji | Rana Bishara | Haitham Ennasr | Tanya Habjouqa
Wafa Hourani | Jeffar Khaldi | Mohammed Musallam | Larissa Sansour
Amer Shomali | Mary Tuma

TIME::CODE

          Whitebox Art Center presents TIME::CODE Video Art from the Present to the Past into the Future Opening celebration Sunday February 23rd | 12-6pm Special Screening Living Room by Michael Snow Sunday February 23rd | 3pm On view… Continue reading

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TIME::CODE

Whitebox Art Center

Whitebox Art Center presents

TIME::CODE
Video Art from the Present to the Past into the Future

On view February 23rd to March 28th 2014
Opening Sunday February 23rd | 12-6pm

Link to exhibition and press release

Oreet Ashery | Dara Birnbaum | Alina and Jeff Bliumis | Robert Boyd
Hans Breder | Tania Candiani | Stefano Cagol | Gordon Cheung | Jaime Davidovich
Braco Dimitrijevic | Adolfo Doring | Dieter Froese | Gary Hill | Ferrán Martín
Mary Mattingly | Jonas Mekas | Yucef Merhi | Igor Molochevski | Iván Navarro
Damian Ontiveros | Dennis Oppenheim | Jean-Gabriel Périot | Larissa Sansour
Arleen Schloss | Carolee Schneemann | Kiki Seror | Michael Snow | S&P Stanikas
Javier Téllez | The Blue Noses | Wojtek Ulrich | Roi Vaara | Helena von Karkkainen
Ai Weiwei | Sislej Xhafa

FAME : Robert Priseman

Whitebox Art Center presents FAME Robert Priseman On view January 8th – February 2nd 2014 Opening reception Thursday January 9th | 7-9pm Link to images of paintings on view Link to opening reception images Link to Press Release Link to event Link… Continue reading

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FAME – Robert Priseman

Whitebox Art Center

Whitebox Art Center presents

FAME
Robert Priseman

On view January 8th – February 2nd 2014

Opening reception Thursday January 9th | 7-9pm

Link to images of paintings on view

Link to opening reception images

Link to Press Release

Whitebox Art Center at PERFORMA13

Whitebox Art Center at PERFORMA13 presents: Unconscious Media, Dieter Meier and Christopher Knowles Unconscious Media (Hans Breder) “Experiments in Intermedial Activism” Live Web Teleconference/ Performance Nov. 2 | 3-5pm Link to event Dieter Meier YELLO Video Performances Exhibition on view Nov. 3 –… Continue reading

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The DownTown Ensemble

DownTown Ensemble

“In so many words…”

“This intrepid group of conceptualists cuts no aesthetic corners.” (The Village Voice)

On Wednesday, June 26, at 8pm, the DownTown Ensemble will perform a program emphasizing music featuring the spoken word. In this vein, the poet/musician George Quasha will present a specially created, new piece Axial Transmission, part of his series of Axial Music. Other new word/music works will be premieres by Daniel Goode, Co-Director of the DownTown Ensemble, and Ensemble member, Alex Waterman. Featured performer/reciter will be longtime Columbia County resident, Bill Hellermann. Also on the program will be a new composition by Leyna Marika Papach and a trio by the renowned composer, Jon Gibson.

Featured instrumental performers will be downtown stalwarts Alex Waterman and Daniel Goode, as well as guest artists Leyna Marike Papach and Charles Stein.

George Quasha, artist and poet, explores a principle (axiality/liminality/configuration) in language, sculpture, drawing, video, sound, installation and performance. Most recent of his 17 books are Axial Stones: An Art of Precarious Balance (2006, foreword Carter Ratcliff); An Art of Limina: Gary Hill’s Works and Writings (2009, with Charles Stein and foreword by Lynne Cooke); Verbal Paradise (2011, preverbs) and Scorned Beauty Comes Up From Behind (2011, preverbs). A 2006 Guggenheim Fellow in video art, his art is: Speaking Portraits recorded over 1,000 artists/poets/composers in 11 countries, which is available online at www.quasha.com. He often performs with Gary Hill, Charles Stein, David Arner and John Beaulieu.

Axial Transmission (approx. 10 min.) is a work of “axial music,” which follows a principle of spontaneous composition without reference to precedent or previous patterns. The music is guided instead by a radical following of actual sounds and languages generated. The emerging sound event is presumed to have an intelligent life independent of the musicians and hence may produce an altered state of listening. In addition to sound and language events, the performance has visual components and sometimes includes video or live axial drawing. In this performance poet/artist/musician Charles Stein contributes vocal-axial-abstract language in dialogue with George Quasha’s axial percussion.

Jon Gibson is a composer, multi-wind instrumentalist and visual artist who has been active in new music since the 1960’s. His output includes music for solo instruments, various ensembles, dance, music theater, film and opera. His music has been performed worldwide by his own groups and others, including the S.E.M. Ensemble, DownTown Ensemble, TILT Brass and Ne(x)tworks. He has performed and collaborated with a host of musicians, choreographers and artists, including Merce Cunningham, Nancy Topf, Nina Winthrop, Lucinda Childs, Harold Budd, Thomas Buckner, David Behrman, Petr Kotik, Alvin Curran, Terri Hanlon, and JoAnne Akalaitis. Gibson was involved in the early work of Steve Reich, Terry Riley, LaMonte Young and Philip Glass, and has been a member of the Philip Glass Ensemble since its beginnings. His work Chorales for Relative Calm has been extracted from a larger work, entitled Relative Calm (1981) that was commissioned by the Lucinda Childs Dance Co. as a part of an evening-length work of four pieces.  “Chorales” consists of a series of short, repeated stop-and-go pieces that is reminiscent of the chorale form (hence the title) in three-part harmony, for any combination of pitched instrument.

Daniel Goode, is Co-founder/Director of the DownTown Ensemble, formed in 1983. In 2004 he initiated the Flexible Orchestra, a rethinking of the symphony orchestra. In its 10th season, he has composed six works for the Flexible Orchestra in various orchestrations. A new CD on New World Records will have his work for the orchestra, Annbling. His innovative music for solo clarinet includes Circular Thoughts (Theodore Presser Co.) and Clarinet Songs on the XI label. His music has been in national and international festivals including New Music America and Bang on a Can, Sounds Like Now. His works are available at Frog Peak Music, www.frogpeak.org. His web site is www.danielsgoode.com

Goode’s new work Interpolating is the latest in a series of texts he has composed for Bill Hellermann to recite, with music accompaniment by the DownTown Ensemble. The text narrates the sometimes fantastical events in the life of the Ensemble. Most prominent is a “guerrilla” performance in the ground floor bar of the Trump Soho in the very neighborhood that gave rise to the group, some thirty years ago when Soho was the experimental laboratory of many groups in the arts. The music chosen to go with Bill Hellermann’s narration is taken from the last thirty years of the DownTown Ensemble’s repertoire.

Leyna Marika Papach, when writing wait game, imagined animating the air around an unsolved crime – the charged air moving, talking and waiting for relief. She is a composer, artist and violinist from Japan and the United States. Her work ranges from chamber music to musical theater pieces where text, dance, music and video work together to tell a story. Her work has been performed in Western and Eastern Europe as well as in Japan and the US. As a violinist and improviser, she performs her own work as well as interpretive work with bands and composers (Geraldine Fibbers, JG Thirwell/Monerexia and many others), occasionally performing as an accompanist of Ragas (North-Indian traditional music). She is currently working on a dance-theater piece as a long-term resident artist at the HERE Arts Center, NY. Ms. Papach studied violin at the Prague Academy of Music and has a Masters in Theater from Dasarts, Amsterdam.

Alex Waterman has worked with musicians such as Robert Ashley, Helmut Lachenmann, Marina Rosenfeld, Anthony Coleman, Elliott Sharp, Ned Rothenberg, Gerry Hemingway, Chris Mann, and Alison Knowles. He is publishing a book about the composer Robert Ashley (coming out this summer). Alex participated in the Armory for the 2008 Whitney Biennial writing a new work based upon Herman Melville’s Bartleby the Scrivener. He is currently producing and directing an all-new Spanish language version of Robert Ashley’s classic television opera, Perfect Lives. Waterman teaches at the MFA program at Bard College and will be teaching at the Banff Centre for the Arts in August this year. His writings have been published by Dot Dot Dot, Paregon, FoArm, BOMB and Artforum.

This performance of Beacons of Ancestorship will consist of selections from the first 63 landscapes of the film script. The final script will have closer to one thousand. The script is based on the original 128-page poem by John Barton Wolgamot, in which each page is a landscape composed of the names of writers, artists and librarians. Beacons is a highly subjective rendering of the poem into a film script that brings to life the memory theater that Wolgamot created in which every name in the poem contains all the others. Waterman’s piece has existed in several forms: installation, publication and radio-play. In the present iteration Bill Hellermann narrates a live radio piece with live Foley and musical accompaniment by the Ensemble.

Bill Hellermann, well known as a composer guitarist in the downtown scene in the 70’s through the 90’s, has in the last ten years increasingly appeared as a reciter/narrator of texts in experimental music works. Among his many awards is a Prix de Rome from The American Academy in Rome. As a curator at PS 1, the Clock Tower and the Alternative Museum, he launched some of the first exhibitions of sound sculpture and audio art, and in the process bringing into usage the term “Soundart”.

The DownTown Ensemble was founded in 1983 by its Co-directors, Daniel Goode and William Hellermann, as a response to a perceived need for repertoire customarily under-represented in today’s new music world. “This intrepid group of conceptualists cuts no aesthetic corners” (The Village Voice). The Ensemble has made its reputation performing a number of different types of experimental music, such as: traditionally notated and graphic music scores; sound/text music; ritual/intermedia pieces; performance art and Fluxus; improvisation in a number of traditions; large ensemble scores for variable (unspecified) instrumentation; and interactive computer music. The group regularly features composers performing and directing their music often written expressly for the Ensemble. There have been over 150 such collaborations since the group’s inception. www.soundart.org/dte.html

This program is made possible with public funds from the New York State Council on the Arts, a State Agency and private contributors.