Tag Archives: video art

On View Now | 585,000 m2 – History of the Jewish Quarter of Budapest A Mixed Media Exhibition

WhiteBox Presents In association with The Balassi Institute- Hungarian Cultural Center 585,000 m2 History of the Jewish Quarter of Budapest A Mixed Media Exhibition April 7-21, 2016 Wednesday through Sunday 11am – 6pm Participating Artists Zsuzsi Flóhr, Zsófia Szemző, Márton Szirmai,… Continue reading

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RECYCLING RELIGION

Kosolapov_my-body
 
RECYCLING RELIGION
December 13 – January 17, 2016

 

Opening reception / Meet the artists.
Join for a conversation with Masha Alyokhina.
Sunday Dec. 13, 5-8 pm

Pussy Riot_8883

Punk Prayer by Pussy Riot

 

Press on Recycling Religion 

 

Artnet News, Pussy Riot’s, Maria Alyokhina on Her Plans for a Women’s Museum, by Cait Munro

 

Press Release

 

Recycling Religion examines the role of religion in Russia and Eastern Europe since the collapse of the Soviet empire. Paradoxically in the modern age, the once repressed and dormant Orthodox Church has evolved in the past quarter century to become an intrinsic and powerful extension of the State, commanding broad influence over life beyond its purely spiritual role.

 

From art and entertainment to dress code, and numerous other aspects of personal behavior, this essentially anachronistic religion insinuates its moralizing, oppressive influence and rancid style into life at large.

 

In the case of art, the Church goes to extreme lengths to impose and control popular taste, to the inevitable disgust of a new generation of artists—a stellar and representative group of which is represented in this exhibition—who dare to employ Orthodox imagery and symbolism to undermine the established religious canon and the dystopia it fosters in harness with state power.

 

To such artists, the Church is but a hollow vessel that sustains itself only with elaborate stage sets and costumes, outdated ritual, and severe moralizing. However, it is their contention that while the regurgitated apparatus of the official Church represents a moribund ideology, it serves also as a foil by which art can transcend tradition and discover the new-within-the-old.

 

This subterfuge is depicted vividly, and in fact compassionately, in this exhibition, in which, through installation, performance, video, and graphic art, the conservative and radical poles of post-Soviet society are shown to in fact interact. As one allegedly spiritual force engages in tearing the world apart while pretending to mend it, another, more pragmatic, biological force appeals to the need to rebuild society out of the ruins of Orthodoxy, thus recycling religion, rather than eradicating it entirely.

 

Marat Guelman / Juan Puntes.

 

Recycling Religion Artists

 

Pussy Riot, Oleg Kulik, Dmitri Gutov, Iija Soskic,
Jelena Tomasevic, Recycle Group, Alexander Kosolapov, Duke Riley + Mac Premo, Federico Solmi, Robert Priseman, ANVIL Collective, Electroboutique,
Vladimir Kozin, Pavel Brat, Arsen Savadov

 

 

Press contact : press@whiteboxny.org

 

Recycling Religion  is supported in part by Dukley European Art Community, Martin C. Liu and WhiteBox board members

 

 

The programs of WhiteBox are made possible in part by the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs and New York State Council for the Arts

 

Special thanks to Postmasters Gallery, Richard Taittinger Gallery, and Magnan Metz Gallery
Special thanks to media sponsor artnet
                    Martin C. Liu and Associates

 

CLICK CLICK CLICK: Screening

Whitebox_CLICKCLICKCLICK 2014_Sabrina Ratté

 Whitebox Art Center presents

Click. Click. Click. Copy. Paste. Drag. Drop. These are the new gestures of digital image making. Click Click Click is a survey of contemporary digital moving image practices that span GIFs, augmented performances, green screen keying, collage, appropriation, Processing, 3D renders and more.

Artists in the screening: Morehshin Allahyari, Claudia Bitran, Hannah Black, Gaby Cepeda and Adriana Minoliti, Jennifer Chan, Jennie Cole, Claire Evans, Dafna Ganani, Geraldine Juárez, Nicole Killian, Claudia Maté, Raquel Meyers, Lorna Mills, Eva Papamargariti, Sabrina Ratté, Tessa Siddle, Giselle Zatonyl

Nicole Killian, Move It, 2013, 30 sec.

Move It is an excerpt from an ongoing investigation into getting the crowd pumped up and moving.

Lorna Mills, Jump Rope, 2011, GIF

Lorna Mills channels and trolls the internet through her assemblage GIFs. Searching the far reaching corners of the world wide web, Mills pulls out the most peculiar, inane, and baffling imagery and then recontextualizes it into her own carefully crafted compositions.

Claudia Bitran, The Zone: Action, 2013, 3:17 min

The Zone is a series of three trailers for movies that do not exist: a Korean horror film, a Latino action film, and a French drama film. In the Latino action trailer, I perform as Macarena de las Heras, a strong and determined woman who has to go through different adventures in order to enter “The Zone.” She rides motorcycles, fights gangsters, tries to get information from the gatas, and shoots guns while running through the desert and making out with hot guys.

Gaby Cepeda and Adriana Minoliti, Conspirativas (series), 2013, GIF

These collaborative images capture an intersection between the artists’ loving interrogations of celebrity culture (Cepeda) and pornography (Minoliti). The result is an image that tackles female sexuality in its vicissitudes.

Claudia Maté, Fill Shapes, 2012, 1:54 min.

Fill Shapes uses Processing and After Effects to make squares and circles dance across the screen in this brightly colored geometric fantasy.

Lorna Mills, Garden Variety (series), 2013, GIF

Lorna Mills, Stress Relief, 2011, GIF

Eva Papamargariti, RandomAccessData, 2014, 4:50 min.

RandomAccessData is a parallel visual and verbal narration between references; it is a stream of information that creates a tag cloud based on random thoughts about post- internet art, radical utopian groups of the ’60s, today’s virtual field, the definitive role of searching and tagging inside the cyberspace, terms like distribution and reproduction of image, constant data flow, internet immersion, real ID vs cyber ID and the notion of auto generated content.

Dafna Ganani, I Dream of I Dream of Jennie, 2013, 3:42 min.

I Dream of I Dream of Jennie is a mediated performance by the artist Dafna Ganani. It references the 70’s American TV series I Dream of Jeannie and uses glitched images of copyrights licenses, biopunked Barbara Eden in her Jeannie costume, dolphins, BIOS homepage to propose a cybernetics fantasy: beings with both organic and cybernetic parts.

Gaby Cepeda and Adriana Minoliti, Conspirativas (series), 2013, GIFs

Hannah Black, Intensive Care/Hot New Track, 2013, 5:36 min

Remixed fragments of what’s allowed to appear on the surface of the world: Rihanna/Chris Brown, US/Iraq, blackness/whiteness, pain/pleasure, money/body. “Love and shame are the theory and the practice.”

Lorna Mills, Garden Variety (series), 2013, GIF

Geraldine Juárez, Love Not Money, 2009, 1:06 min

In 2009, months after the stock market meltdown, i created a personal stock market to track my assets: desires, work, routines, expectations and emotions – and how the way i valued them felt closer to death, money or love.

The video is the output of four weeks of emotional capitalism, where my assets were collected in a notebook and mapped and visualized originally in Processing.

Claire Evans, Digital Decay: Meditation/Disintegration, 2011, 1:50 min

Meditation/Disintegration is an animation of individual video frames saved in incrementally lower file formats hundreds and hundreds of times. Where is the line at which compression ceases to preserve information entirely? The digital image washes away on the tide of its own preservation. The beach ball is the third eye.

Lorna Mills, Splode (series), 2012, GIF

Morehshin Allahyari, The Romantic Self-Exiles I, 2012, 5:06 min.

To build a land; an imaginary home. To push the limits of real and unreal, memory and imagination, locality and universality. To put together my most vivid memories on flat planes or 3D cubes. Inside and outside the empty rooms, rooms without bodies, rooms left behind. A reflection and presentation of emotional attachments. Collective and personal.

Jennie Cole, a device of a special type, 2012, 3:32 min.

a device of special type investigates encounters with text in electronic media, in response to Donna Haraway’s assertion that writing is ‘pre-eminently the technology of cyborgs’. Exploring ideas of transhumanist possibility alongside the manipulations of identity suggested by the internet’s corporate ‘like’, the language in this video is at once page-based, screen-based, illuminated and infiltrated by symbols and logos.

Lorna Mills, Garden Variety (series), 2013, GIFs

Tessa Siddle, Hexenhaus, 2010, 2:47 min.

Hexenhaus is a video fragment from a series of work about domestic ritual and relations between humans, houseplants, and animals. Following the collapse of a relationship a failed banishing ritual is performed with my pet houseplants/familiars. An attempt to convert loneliness into solitude results in only more loneliness.

Nicole Killian, Attention, 2013, 2:53 min.

Attention is a video exploring mall madness and meditation.

Gaby Cepeda and Adriana Minoliti, Conspirativas (series), 2013, GIFs

Giselle Zatonyl, The Harm of Coming into Existence, 2014, 1:57 min.

Zatonyl’s 3D rendered video juxtaposes glittery, soft colors with hard lines forming an imaginative factoy-like space that produces unknown, but assuredly delightful things.

Jennifer Chan, Boyfriend 男友 [Nanyou], 2014, 6:27 min.

BOYFRIEND combines YouTube-captured webcam videos with images of dominant East Asian masculinity. Headlined by a Mandarin cover of Justin Bieber’s pop hit Boyfriend, K-pop stars, J-pop stars, Taiwanese diaspora, and Canto-pop icons, are recut against confessional Asian American “dudes” to deliberate the superficial aspects of performing the archetypal romantic straight male partner in Asian culture.

Lorna Mills, Linguine Primavera, 2013, GIF

Lorna Mills, Kitty Fire, 2011, GIF

Raquel Meyers, 2SLEEP1 ❚❚❚❚❚❚❚ 002. MATSAMÖT, 2013, 3:23 min.

Matsamöt is part of 2SLEEP1, a playlist of audiovisual performances in text mode, designed to make you fall asleep. The music interface and the graphics are built up from text symbols (PETSCII). Made by Raquel Meyers and Goto80 using c-64.

Sabrina Ratté, The Land Behind, 2013, 4:56 min.

Traveling on an undefined territory where the illusion of a continuous tracking shot emphasizes an unreachable destination. Through the syncopated editing and multiple transitions, images of the area themselves become traveling entities, creating confusion on the level of the depicted space as much as with the level of its temporality.

Photo caption : Still from Sabrina Ratté’s The Land Behind, 2013, 4:56 min.

 

Whitebox Art Center DCA sponsor

Coded After Lovelace

Claudia Hart's "Caress"

Whitebox Art Center presents

Coded After Lovelace

Curated by Faith Holland & Nora O’ Murchú

Exhibition on view August 14th – September 2nd 2014
Opening reception Thursday August 14th  | 6-8pm

Carla Gannis | Claudia Hart | Olia Lialina | Jillian Mayer | Rosa Menkman | Arleen Schloss | Lillian F Schwartz

Press

Hyperallergic, Tracing a Lineage of Tech-Minded Women Artists by Jillian Steinhauer

Riposte Magazine, Coded After Lovelace by Emma Tucker

Mandy Machine, All of Piece; Maria Lassnig and Coded After Lovelace by Mandy Morrison

New York City – Coded After Lovelace offers a survey of art that critically reflects on the creative use of technology: its developments and limitations. From the room-sized computers of the Bell Labs era to the tablet-based work of today, these seven artists question the boundary between art and technology. Coded After Lovelace creates a new lineage across artists of different generations.

Link to full press release

Press Contact: press@whiteboxny.org

Whitebox Art Center DCA sponsor

NO EXIT : A Project by Khaled Jarrar

Still from Khaled Jarrar's "I. Soldier"

Whitebox Art Center Presents

NO EXIT
A Project by Khaled Jarrar
On View July 24th – August 9th (extended)

Opening reception at Whitebox Art Center July 24th 5 – 7 pm

Link to images and press packet 

New York City – Whitebox Art Center presents a solo show by Palestinian artist Khaled Jarrar, produced and curated by Myriam Vanneschi.

The Israel Border Police denied artist Khaled Jarrar exit to travel to NYC for this project and his participation in the show Here and Elsewhere at the New Museum. He has since decided to create a new work for this show that deals with his status as well as the current situation in Gaza. This new media piece will be live updated as the situation develops.

Khaled Jarrar describes his experience attempting to leave Palestine on July 23rd, 2014: “Another massacre is taking place in Gaza, and Israel is trying to sell it as a war with Hamas using a deceptive media campaign, turning the oppressed into a villain. It is a fact that Israel is an occupying and apartheid country that controls our land, steals our water and natural resources, depriving us of our basic human rights for the past 66 years. The Israeli recurrent massacres will never end. Telling and sharing our stories and what is happening in Palestine is very essential. We are obliged to take the streets and strongly condemn the killing of the people of Gaza”.

NO EXIT is produced and curated by Myriam Vanneschi and co-produced by Igor Molochevski.
The programs of Whitebox Art Center are made possible in part by the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs.

Press Contact: press@whiteboxny.org

Links to Press:

ArtFCity: Weighing Risks After Last Weeks Cancelled Pro-Palestine Workshop by Whitney Kimball

WNYC RADIO: Art That Reaches Beyond Palestine by Deborah Solomon & Gisele Regatao

Hyperallergic: The Real Life Politics of Palestinian Art in New York by Hrag Vartanian

Artnet News: Pro-Palestine Exhibition Cancelled in NYC by Ben Davis

Hyperallergic: Israel Denies Exit for Palestinian Artist In New Museum Show by Myriam Vanneschi

Le Monde: Khaled Jarrar, artiste et militaire palestinien, n’ira pas à New York by Robin Braquet

Animal New York: Israel Denies Exit Palestinian Artist Bars Attending His New Museum Show by Marina Galperina

ArtNews: No Exit for Palestinian Artist Khaled Jarrar

DCA_Logo

Now You See

Cheng Ran, The Sorrows of Young Werther, 2009. Video still. Courtesy the artist.

Whitebox Art Center presents

Now You See

New Chinese Video Art from the Collection of Dr. Michael I. Jacobs

Opening reception Wednesday May 28th | 6-8pm
Exhibition on view May 25th – June 19th 2014

Shiyuan Liu | Li Ming | Cheng Ran | Chen Xiaoyuan | Hu Xiaoyuan
Wang Xin | Kan Xuan | Sun Xun | Liang Yue | Jiang Zhi

Link to press release

This exhibition made possible by Paul and Moya Coulson.
Additional funding provided by Robin Kellner Sicher and John Sicher
Lawrence Graev and Anthony Orphanos.

Image courtesy of the artist Cheng Ran

How Green Was My Valley – Artist talk

Whitebox Art Center

Center for Palestine Studies, Alwan for the Arts, ArtPalestine International and Whitebox Art Center present

How Green Was My Valley – Artist talk
Due to technical difficulties, the talk has been moved from Alwan For The Arts to Whitebox Art Center

Friday April 4th | 7:30pm
Joseph Audeh, Samira Badran & Mary Tuma | Moderated by Dr. Raouf J. Halaby

Free and open to the public
- Doors open at 6:30pm

Link to exhibition and press release
Link to Reading and Performance event
Link to Dr. Raouf J. Halaby’s article on Counter Punch

Joseph Audeh
(b. 1989, Sarasota, Florida)

Joseph Audeh currently lives and works in New York. His work engages architecture, environmental change, and technology. His various projects imagine solutions to meet future energy needs by combining old forms of environmental knowledge with breakthroughs in emerging technology. Audeh was selected as a Berkeley Design Fellow (2011), a finalist for the Frieze Writer’s Prize (2012), and a traveling artist for the River Has Two Banks at Makan Art Space, Amman (2012). He recently completed an artist residency at Townhouse Gallery, Cairo (2013).

Samira Badran
(b. 1954, Libya)

Samira Badran was born to Palestinian parents in Tripoli, Libya and currently lives and works in Barcelona. Her father, Islamic artist Jamal Badran influenced her practice, which uses a wide range of mediums including painting, collage, photography, and installation. She has exhibited at the Sharjah Biennial, Al Hoash—the Palestinian Art Court in Jerusalem, The UNESCO Palace in Paris, The Modern Art Gallery in Baghdad, the Jordanian National Gallery of Fine Arts in Amman, the Washington Museum of Women in the Arts, Musèe du Luxembourg, Paris, Centro Internazionale Multimedia, Italy, Gemeetemuseum den Haag, Foreign Ministry of Berlin, Al-Ma’mal Foundation, Jerusalem and Espai Agora, Barcelona.

Mary Tuma
(b. 1961, Oakland)

Mary Tuma was born in California in 1961 to a native Californian mother of Irish descent and a Palestinian father. She currently lives and works in Charlotte, North Carolina. She began sewing and crocheting with her mother at an early age. Her love of these processes led her to begin her formal study of art as an apprentice at Beautiful Arts Hall in Kerdassa, Egypt, where she learned to weave tapestries. Tuma’s work has been shown, nationally and internationally, in such venues as the Crocker Art Museum, The Maruki Gallery in Hiroshima, The Southeastern Center for Contemporary Art, Al-Kahf Gallery in Bethlehem, The Cheongju International Craft Biennial, the Station Museum in Houston and Contemporary Projects in Kuwait City. Her work has appeared in Contemporary Practices, Art in America, Dar Al-Hayat, The New York Times, The Christian Science Monitor, Counterpunch, NYArts, Mother Jones,The San Francisco Chronicle and The Jordan Star, among others.

Moderator – Raouf J. Halaby
(b. 1945, Jerusalem)

Raouf J. Halaby is a native of Jerusalem, Palestine. In 1959 he moved from Upper Bakaa to Beirut, Lebanon and graduated with honors from the National Protestant Secondary School in 1964. He was awarded a Bachelor and Master’s degrees from Ouachita Baptist University, and his Ed.D. in the College Teaching of English from Texas A&M University in 1973. He studied Art History in Rome, Italy.

Since 1973, he has been teaching at his alma mater and is in his 41st year as a Professor of English and Art. Halaby has served on national, regional and local boards, as a consultant for University of Minnesota’s Immigration History Research center. He is a widely-published author, a regular contributor to CounterPunch, a photographer, and an award-winning sculptor, whose works have been exhibited nationally. He is a peace activist dedicated to the cause of Palestine and her dispossessed people.

Thank you to the co-sponsors of the Artist Talk

Center for Palestine Studies, Alwan for the Arts, ArtPalestine International

alwan logo final 10-2013   cps logo blue (3)   ArtPalestineInternational_logo

How Green Was My Valley – Opening Celebration

Whitebox Art Center

ArtPalestine International and Whitebox Art Center present

How Green Was My Valley

On view April 3rd – 27th 2014
Opening celebration Thursday April 3rd | 6-8 pm
Readings and Performance Thursday April 10th | 5-7:30pm

Link to exhibition and press release
Link to Reading and Performance event

Mohamed Abusal | Tarek Al Ghoussein | Mohammed Al Hawajri | Joseph Audeh
Samira Badran | Taysir Batniji | Rana Bishara | Haitham Ennasr | Tanya Habjouqa
Wafa Hourani | Jeffar Khaldi | Mohammed Musallam | Larissa Sansour
Amer Shomali | Mary Tuma

The Armory Show 2014: Armory Arts Week LOWER EAST SIDE DAY

Whitebox Art Center

Whitebox Art Center Hosts
The Armory Show 2014: Armory Arts Week LOWER EAST SIDE DAY
Sunday, March 9th | 11am to 6pm
RSVP to press@whiteboxny.org
Link to The Armory Arts Week

TIME::CODE
Video Art from the Present to the Past into the Future
On view February 23rd to March 28th 2014

Link to exhibition and press release

Oreet Ashery | Dara Birnbaum | Alina and Jeff Bliumis | Robert Boyd
Hans Breder | Tania Candiani | Stefano Cagol | Gordon Cheung | Jaime Davidovich
Braco Dimitrijevic | Adolfo Doring | Dieter Froese | Gary Hill | Ferrán Martín
Mary Mattingly | Jonas Mekas | Yucef Merhi | Igor Molochevski | Iván Navarro
Damian Ontiveros | Dennis Oppenheim | Jean-Gabriel Périot | Larissa Sansour
Arleen Schloss | Carolee Schneemann | Kiki Seror | Michael Snow | S&P Stanikas
Javier Téllez | The Blue Noses | Wojtek Ulrich | Roi Vaara | Helena von Karkkainen
Ai Weiwei | Sislej Xhafa

TIME:CODE is an exhibition of video art selected from Whitebox Art Center’s archive. The title and curatorial framework metaphorically weave technical nomenclature for video and film synchronization and the experimental film directed by Mike Figgis. The former is addressed in the historical arc of the exhibition consisting of important works by early video pioneers, including Michael Snow, Jonas Mekas, Carolee Schneemann, Gary Hill, Dieter Froese, Dara Birnbaum, Dennis Oppenheim and Jaime Davidovich, shown alongside a succeeding generation of video artists including Ai Weiwei, Gordon Cheung, Sislej Xhafa and others who have engaged the medium as innovatively as their predecessors.

Whitebox Art Center

TIME::CODE

          Whitebox Art Center presents TIME::CODE Video Art from the Present to the Past into the Future Opening celebration Sunday February 23rd | 12-6pm Special Screening Living Room by Michael Snow Sunday February 23rd | 3pm On view… Continue reading

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