Tag Archives: International

CLOSING PARTY – SOUNDS OF THE GHETTO CONCERT

“Electro-acoustic improvisations, compositions and manipulations creating sonic landscapes confronting the ideas of open and limited space.” Thursday, April 21. 2016, 7pm Guy Barash– laptop & electronics Frank London – trumpet & electronics Eyal Maoz – guitar & electronics images from… Continue reading

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On View Now | 585,000 m2 – History of the Jewish Quarter of Budapest A Mixed Media Exhibition

WhiteBox Presents In association with The Balassi Institute- Hungarian Cultural Center 585,000 m2 History of the Jewish Quarter of Budapest A Mixed Media Exhibition April 7-21, 2016 Wednesday through Sunday 11am – 6pm Participating Artists Zsuzsi Flóhr, Zsófia Szemző, Márton Szirmai,… Continue reading

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Carlos Salas – The Heart of the Matter

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WhiteBox presents:

 

Carlos Salas: The Heart of the Matter

On view April 29 through May 29 2016

Preview: Friday April 29, 6-8 pm

Opening Reception: Sunday May 8, 4-7 pm

 

New York City- WhiteBox is pleased to announce The Heart of the Matter,  a traveling solo exhibition by Carlos Salas. An internationally renowned Colombian abstractionist, this show marks the artist’s first New York exhibition at WhiteBox. The stunning, multifaceted project is a compelling synthesis—with variations—of his most recent Museum of Contemporary Art Miami show ‘Latin America and the Global Imagination’.

Salas’s work, inspired by Carl Jung’s concepts of the collective unconscious and Joseph Campbell’s work in comparative mythology, investigates the potential of pure, unbounded imagination in the artistic process. Salas has been engaged in a wide range of activities and initiatives in art-making and discoursing: painting, sculpting, installation, film and writing to tackle head-on the state of the human condition vis- à-vis art. His work is a site for exploration of the boundaries in which human subjectivity is located, where Salas poses questions that reveal the limits of particular theoretical frameworks, while calling for a critical current engagement across traditions and cultures. A manifold of diverse trajectories and experiences of contemporary issues comprise his expansive oeuvre, constantly scrutinizing all possible intersections explored from unexpected angles, proposing new examinations and counter narratives.

Constantly questioning the very basis of what constitutes abstraction, Carlos Salas tests the limits of our personal understanding. Salas is responsible for essential advancements in furthering and decoding abstraction today. The artist’s blazing spirit is evident in his elaborate brush strokes that resemble scratches and scars that—while open to interpretation and analysis, eg, the Colombian environment at large—cannot hide the artist’s intensity, existential passion, and aesthetic genius.

As a practical tool of communicating the viewer Salas’s origins in his abstract painting, the exhibition includes an interactive set of scattered video screens adroitly interspersed among his large abstract paintings. The film, dexterously and intimately directed by Ana Salas, the artist’s daughter, feeds visual fragments embodying the process, routine, and environment of the making of ‘Into the Abyss’, the centerpiece painting in the exhibition.

Carlos Salas, born in 1957 in Pitalito, studied architecture in the Universidad de los Andes in Bogota and later painting at the École des Beaux-Arts in Paris. He has received multiple accolades in France and his native Colombia for his contributions to abstract art. At the age of 42 he was one of the youngest artist to ever present a retrospective at the Bogota Museum of Modern Art. Carlos Salas has been involved in promoting and diffusing art in alternative spaces, including Gaula (1991), Espacio Vacío (1996), and Mundo (2001-2011). Between 2001 and 2011, he was engaged in Mundo gallery and the production of Mundo magazine, releasing 40 publications.

 

 

NYSCA     Department of Cultural Affairs NYC

CLOSING PARTY OF 585,000M2 – SOUNDS OF THE GHETTO

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WhiteBox Presents
In association with The Balassi Institute- Hungarian Cultural Center

585,000 m2
History of the Jewish Quarter of Budapest
A Mixed Media Exhibition

CLOSING – Thursday, April 21 | 7pm

“Electro-acoustic improvisations, compositions and manipulations creating sonic landscapes confronting the ideas of open and limited space.”

Guy Barash- laptop & electronics
Frank London – trumpet & electronics
Eyal Maoz – guitar & electronics

The Hungarian Cultural Center is presenting Sounds of the Ghetto, a special avantgarde musical endeavor as the finissage of the exhibition at WhiteBox. Grammy Award winner Frank London teams up with Guy Barash and Eyal Maoz to present a special musical program inspired by urban spaces that used to be Ghettos at a certain point of history. The improvisational program will reflect on the theme and also on the exhibits, created by young Hungarian Artists.

Trumpeter Frank London is a Grammy award winner, founding member of the Klezmatics, and leader of the Glass House Orchestra, presenting performances world wide. Guitarist Eyal Maoz is known internationally for his work in improvised and new Jewish music, with the group Abraxas and many cds on John Zorn’s Tzadik label. Composer/performer Guy Barash just released his first recording of chamber music. His first opera will be premiered this year.

585,000 m2 – History of the Jewish Quarter of Budapest A Mixed Media Exhibition

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WhiteBox Presents
In association with The Balassi Institute- Hungarian Cultural Center

585,000 m2
History of the Jewish Quarter of Budapest
A Mixed Media Exhibition

April 7-21, 2016

OPENING – Thursday, April 7 | 6-8pm

Participating Artists
Zsuzsi Flóhr, Zsófia Szemző, Márton Szirmai, Dániel Halász, István Illés, Levente Csordás in collaboration with Miklós Mendrei and Benjamin Kalászi, Balázs Varjú Tóth, Mátyás Csiszár along with Csaba Kalotás (music) and Éva Szombat (photo).

 

585,000 m2 examines the symbolic spaces and the inscriptions of history -from the pre-World War 2 period to the present-found in the Jewish Quarter in the 7th district of Budapest, through visual art statements. The title is a reference to the massive surface area of the Quarter, a dense urban neighborhood overflowing with signifiers.

The curators invited nine young Hungarian artists to reflect upon particular buildings and discover the stories behind them, in their own artistic tone, using mostly visual media to mediate between past and present, history and art, artist and society. The conceptual installations and mixed media works operate as visual manifestos to alert the audience to both the history-defying existence of the Quarter itself, where Jews and non-Jews now once more converge, and the revival of cultural, religious, and social life rooted in the history of cohabitation before and after the Shoah.

The diversity of the Quarter is mirrored by the variegated techniques of the participating artists. Coming from different fields of contemporary arts, the most important intersection of the contributors is the Quarter itself, the space that beyond a geographical location operates as an irreducible excess. This excess contains the survival and revival of those marked for death but also the unquantifiable violence unleashed on the area and its inhabitants during World War 2, as well as, more recently, of the co-existence of traditional and experimental cultural life. Through the past decade the Quarter transformed itself and became the place that it is today, forming the identity of another generation of young Hungarians, among them the artists who now propose their statements, drawing on both cultural and personal memory.

Mixing archival and present-day frames with individual video installations, the exhibition invites the audience to step into the Quarter, to experience its bustling religious and cultural life and the artists’ transformative vision of this life. The video installations focus on individual buildings, their functions today, and on how the stories that can be told about them give rise to a vision of the Quarter. They also document, without looking away, the radical interventions to which it was subjected by the perpetrators of the Shoah, leaving an indelible mark on private and public spaces alike. Each installation provides a unique and idiosyncratic portrait of the spaces, showing the effects of time and how the present faces, accepts, and adopts the past.

Curated by:
Andrea Ausztrics, Historian and Media Artist
Zita Mara Vadász, Curator, Balassi Institute – Hungarian Cultural Center, New York

Contact:
press@whiteboxny
Presented by Balassi Institute – Hungarian Cultural Center and WhiteBox, in association with Tom Lantos Institute, the Consulate General of Hungary in New York, the Ministry for Foreign Affairs and Trade of Hungary, the Hungarian National Tourist Office in New York.

The programs of WhiteBox are made possible in part by the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs and New York State Council for the Arts

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JEAN PIERRE MULLER 7×7 : COLORBOX & A RED SHOW IN A

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7×7 with ROBERT WYATT | ARCHIE SHEPP | NILE RODGERS | TERRY RILEY | SEAN O’HAGAN | MULATU ASTATKE | KASSIN
EXHIBITION – FEBRUARY 29th TO M ARCH 29th 2016
OPENING RECEPTION – SUNDAY MARCH 6th | 4-8PM
Music Performance @ WhiteBox | Archie Shepp March 29th
Live transmission | Archie Shepp MARCH 6th

Press

Night Flight, “Colorbox” and “A Red Show in A”: Jean Pierre Muller’s “7×7″ art project continues at WhiteBox on NYC’s Lower East Side By Bryan
Le Soir, Rendre Hommage à un Islam Tolérant, by Philippe Manche (March 15, 2016)
The Armory Arts Show, JEAN PIERRE MULLER 7X7 : COLORBOX & A RED SHOW IN A

ColorBox and A Red Show in A are the latest works to emerge from Jean Pierre Muller’s innovative 7×7 project. 7×7 is an inter-disciplinary collaboration between Belgian artist Muller and seven musical luminaries from a variety of contemporary genres; Nile Rodgers, Robert Wyatt, Mulatu Astatke, Archie Shepp, Sean O’Hagan, Kassin and Terry Riley. 7×7 is based on the simple principle that the seven colors of the rainbow correspond to the seven notes of the scale, the seven days of the week (and deities and planets associated with those days) and the seven chakras. Seven sound altarpieces have been created, in an edition of seven, each housing an original music by one of the seven composers. A is Red is Monday, Day of the Moon and of Diana (Robert Wyatt), B is Orange is Tuesday, Day of Mars (Archie Shepp), and so on.

In the summer of 2012, Muller created a full site-specific set for 7×7 at Edinburgh’s Summerhall: 7x7th Street. As its name suggests, this was actually a real street with billboards, signs, small houses, …

A year later, Jean Pierre Muller and Nile Rodgers created An Indigo Night in F at the same venue, an amazing show combining music, live painting and theatre. This acclaimed event was inspired by their collaboration on the 7×7-F-Indigo sound altarpiece.

For WhiteBox, Jean Pierre Muller will present two original shows related to 7×7: ColorBox on the main level and A Red show in A on the lower level.

ColorBox

Isaac Newton divided his color wheel in seven parts: red, orange, yellow, green, blue, indigo and violet. White is in the central part of the diagram, because all colors of light mixed together produce white. 7×7  at WhiteBox makes complete sense.

How can we embrace diversity in a world torn by the conflict between standardization and obsession for identity? Muller wishes to pen the color box and celebrate the full spectrum of our lives in their many contradictions. Rather than taking the stance of the artist as a moralist, he embarks us on a journey through the seas of complexity and the skies of hybridity.

Sometimes taking a sound panoramic view on things – drawing lessons from past history, digging into the origins of words, the meaning of symbols – sometimes zooming into our most intimate obsessions, Muller utters a multi-layered cry for life, plural yet deeply personal.

As much a painter as a printmaker, Jean Pierre Muller also uses light, sound and interactivity to make us feel the beat of the world, the rhythm of life. The elements that Jean Pierre uses in his art reflect processes of urban evolution and the way people become connected to each other through common experiences and references. Like streets grown organically over time, these elements interact through juxtaposition and ever increasing layers of complexity and history. They also tell many intertwined stories, much like the intertwined stories of people in a street, who may not know each other but are linked through commonality of space and time.

A Red Show in A

Jean Pierre, together with Robert Wyatt, one of music’s greatest shamans, has expanded and deepened the rich material used for their 7×7-Red-A sound altarpiece. It is a nostalgic salute to Al-Andalusia, when Spain was under Moorish rule and religions coexisted peacefully (at least, this is the way one can dream of it today, when everything concurs to convince us we’re at war with the others). The most powerful symbol of this period is the Alhambra palace in Granada. This golden age ended in 1492 with the Alhambra Decree and the expulsion of all the Jews from Spain. Al-Hamra  means the Red one, in Arabic…

For WhiteBox, the artist has built his own Alhambra, a red temple to house the 7×7-Red-A sound altarpiece, with meaningful columns and whispering walls (with voices by Robert Wyatt, but also Terry Riley, Archie Shepp and Nile Rodgers). Muller has adapted Kazimir Malevich’s emblematic paintings of the Black Square, the Black Circle and the Black Cross into a Red Star of David, a Red Crescent and a Red Cross. These are powerful symbols to initiate a new reflection on hybridity, coexistence, expulsion… and the power of symbols.

Following on from the success of 7x7th Street  and An Indigo Night in F  with Nile Rodgers, Spectrum  and A Red Show in A represent the next stage in a truly international project of ever-growing artistic ambition and cultural resonance.

 

www.7x7project.com

www.jpmuller.be

Jean Pierre Muller is a Belgian Neo-pop artist who makes vibrant assemblages using high and low forms and techniques. In his work, photography, drawing, silk-screen and painting come together and gestural and mechanical interventions meet. His collaborations with musicians offer an interactivity to his paintings, giving his audience new participatory ways of entering his world. Jean Pierre is committed to both his art practice and his role as head of the Printmaking Department at La Cambre, one of Belgium’s leading schools of art and design. His work has been shown at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Saragossa, the Hanover World Fair, the Royal Festival Hall and, latterly, Summerhall as part of the Edinburgh Festival.

Robert Wyatt was a founding member of the Soft Machine, who along with Pink Floyd helped to transform the late sixties psychedelic scene in the UK into something more lasting. In his long and distinguished solo career, he has been mixing simple and effective keyboard melody lines with poignant lyrics, often filled with personal and political references. He’s simply the most beautiful voice in English music (5 to 6 octaves of range, each octave is of a totally different character), and the long list of his collaborators includes Jimi Hendrix, Mike Oldfield, Brian Eno, Björk, David Gilmour or Paul Weller.

NYSCA     Department of Cultural Affairs NYC

HONKY

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Whitebox Art Center and MAK Gallery present

 

Piotr Skiba’s New York Premiere Performance

Piotr Skiba at Whitebox Art Center

 

On view June 20th through 22nd 2014
Opening reception June 20th | 6-8pm

Link to images

New York City – Piotr Skiba’s New York premiere performance — HONKY — features a series of video installations that make use of elements of the ready-made & the found, combined with sequential performance footage to produce a single, if contextually fragmented, narrative focused on individual displacement. In a series of episodic self-portraiture — as if unpacking the Russian dolls of invented characters — Skiba offers a glimpse of his self-made mythology on the one hand, while on the other he opens a discussion on alterity, and the intense erosion of tolerance affecting the homogenous society of Poland.

The artist, penetrating the fluid boundary between himself and the Other, multiplies the motif of the mask. White mask vs. Black mask. Negative space, the relevant shapes; the “real” subject of conversation is oftentimes created by a deliberate reversal of the figure and ground. A Honky-Polack drowning in the incomprehensible soundscape of New York illuminates the desolation of the anonymous hobo-preacher, whose black silhouette seemed so arbitrarily pinned onto the whiteboard of Skiba’s hometown as to become his shamanic alter ego. Skiba projects persistent feelings of displacement — by setting things in a configuration and an environment where they in their turn displace and alienate, and thereby acquire a new aspect, an unfamiliar affect despite being familiar objects and ordinary people.

The key to the curatorial perspective may lie in the sculpture of Black Homer: an oversized plush “bath slipper” sprayed with matte paint which transforms one of the most influential characters in the history of TV — Homer Simpson — into a powerful totemic presence. Flattened by a black finish, the already dull features of this American suburban stereotype take on a painfully amorphous yet threatening expression. Power found, or power redeemed by blackness on a flip of this particular coin feeding a fascination of a young Polack with hip-hop, or rap culture.

The viewer is thrown into a disturbing carnival of schizophrenia when confronted by either the hoodie of the imaginary black figure from Skiba’s performance, a white high-end latex mask reminiscent of bank robberies, or the impenetrability of a foreign language described by Canetti as an ‘acoustic mask’. By a series of transpositions performed on the artist’s own face, body, or individual limbs used as fragmented images isolated from their original context, Skiba produces the associations of exclusion, loss, and finally, impending madness.

Special thanks to MAK Gallery. For more information on MAK Gallery visit http://www.makgallery.com/ Like MAK Gallery on Facebook

Contact press at press@whiteboxny.org

Link to artist website
Link to more information on Dorota Czerner, Curator
Print

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Dada on Tour

Whitebox Art Center

Presented by Zürich Meets New York: A Festival of Swiss Ingenuity

in partnership with Dada 100 Zurich 2016, Cabaret Voltaire in Zürich, and Whitebox Art Center

Dada on Tour

On view May 18th through 22nd 2014
Opening celebration Sunday May 18th | 11 – 6pm

Jean Arp | Hugo Ball | André Breton | Marcel Duchamp | Baroness Elsa von Freytag-Loringhoven | Francis Picabia | Sophie Taeuber-Arp | Tristan Tzara | and others

Born at Zurich’s Cabaret Voltaire in 1916, the Dada movement quickly spread to cities such as New York, Berlin and Paris. Enter a “nomadic” tent and discover the visions, actions, scandals and love stories of 165 Dadaists: Jean Arp, Hugo Ball, André Breton, Marcel Duchamp, Baroness Elsa von Freytag-Loringhoven, Francis Picabia, Sophie Taeuber-Arp and Tristan Tzara, among others. The multimedia installation features the “Starry Heaven of Dada,” mapping the journey of this international art movement from 1916 to 1923.

Zürich Meets New York: A Festival of Swiss Ingenuity, May 16-23, 2014, highlights the contemporary relevance of visionary movements and ideas born in Zurich and their impact on American culture. Building on the upcoming 100th anniversary of the Dada movement and Zurich’s role as a 21st-century hub for artistic and scientific innovation, the festival features 25 events at venues across the city, and is presented by the Consulate General of Switzerland in New York, the City of Zurich, ETH Zurich and the University of Zurich (UZH).

Free admission

link to Dada On Tour

Caption : Schweizerisches Literaturarchiv (SLA), Bern. Estate Hugo Ball/ Emmy Hennings