Tag Archives: Arab Contemporary World

JEAN PIERRE MULLER 7×7 : COLORBOX & A RED SHOW IN A

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7×7 with ROBERT WYATT | ARCHIE SHEPP | NILE RODGERS | TERRY RILEY | SEAN O’HAGAN | MULATU ASTATKE | KASSIN
EXHIBITION – FEBRUARY 29th TO M ARCH 29th 2016
OPENING RECEPTION – SUNDAY MARCH 6th | 4-8PM
Music Performance @ WhiteBox | Archie Shepp March 29th
Live transmission | Archie Shepp MARCH 6th

Press

Night Flight, “Colorbox” and “A Red Show in A”: Jean Pierre Muller’s “7×7″ art project continues at WhiteBox on NYC’s Lower East Side By Bryan
Le Soir, Rendre Hommage à un Islam Tolérant, by Philippe Manche (March 15, 2016)
The Armory Arts Show, JEAN PIERRE MULLER 7X7 : COLORBOX & A RED SHOW IN A

ColorBox and A Red Show in A are the latest works to emerge from Jean Pierre Muller’s innovative 7×7 project. 7×7 is an inter-disciplinary collaboration between Belgian artist Muller and seven musical luminaries from a variety of contemporary genres; Nile Rodgers, Robert Wyatt, Mulatu Astatke, Archie Shepp, Sean O’Hagan, Kassin and Terry Riley. 7×7 is based on the simple principle that the seven colors of the rainbow correspond to the seven notes of the scale, the seven days of the week (and deities and planets associated with those days) and the seven chakras. Seven sound altarpieces have been created, in an edition of seven, each housing an original music by one of the seven composers. A is Red is Monday, Day of the Moon and of Diana (Robert Wyatt), B is Orange is Tuesday, Day of Mars (Archie Shepp), and so on.

In the summer of 2012, Muller created a full site-specific set for 7×7 at Edinburgh’s Summerhall: 7x7th Street. As its name suggests, this was actually a real street with billboards, signs, small houses, …

A year later, Jean Pierre Muller and Nile Rodgers created An Indigo Night in F at the same venue, an amazing show combining music, live painting and theatre. This acclaimed event was inspired by their collaboration on the 7×7-F-Indigo sound altarpiece.

For WhiteBox, Jean Pierre Muller will present two original shows related to 7×7: ColorBox on the main level and A Red show in A on the lower level.

ColorBox

Isaac Newton divided his color wheel in seven parts: red, orange, yellow, green, blue, indigo and violet. White is in the central part of the diagram, because all colors of light mixed together produce white. 7×7  at WhiteBox makes complete sense.

How can we embrace diversity in a world torn by the conflict between standardization and obsession for identity? Muller wishes to pen the color box and celebrate the full spectrum of our lives in their many contradictions. Rather than taking the stance of the artist as a moralist, he embarks us on a journey through the seas of complexity and the skies of hybridity.

Sometimes taking a sound panoramic view on things – drawing lessons from past history, digging into the origins of words, the meaning of symbols – sometimes zooming into our most intimate obsessions, Muller utters a multi-layered cry for life, plural yet deeply personal.

As much a painter as a printmaker, Jean Pierre Muller also uses light, sound and interactivity to make us feel the beat of the world, the rhythm of life. The elements that Jean Pierre uses in his art reflect processes of urban evolution and the way people become connected to each other through common experiences and references. Like streets grown organically over time, these elements interact through juxtaposition and ever increasing layers of complexity and history. They also tell many intertwined stories, much like the intertwined stories of people in a street, who may not know each other but are linked through commonality of space and time.

A Red Show in A

Jean Pierre, together with Robert Wyatt, one of music’s greatest shamans, has expanded and deepened the rich material used for their 7×7-Red-A sound altarpiece. It is a nostalgic salute to Al-Andalusia, when Spain was under Moorish rule and religions coexisted peacefully (at least, this is the way one can dream of it today, when everything concurs to convince us we’re at war with the others). The most powerful symbol of this period is the Alhambra palace in Granada. This golden age ended in 1492 with the Alhambra Decree and the expulsion of all the Jews from Spain. Al-Hamra  means the Red one, in Arabic…

For WhiteBox, the artist has built his own Alhambra, a red temple to house the 7×7-Red-A sound altarpiece, with meaningful columns and whispering walls (with voices by Robert Wyatt, but also Terry Riley, Archie Shepp and Nile Rodgers). Muller has adapted Kazimir Malevich’s emblematic paintings of the Black Square, the Black Circle and the Black Cross into a Red Star of David, a Red Crescent and a Red Cross. These are powerful symbols to initiate a new reflection on hybridity, coexistence, expulsion… and the power of symbols.

Following on from the success of 7x7th Street  and An Indigo Night in F  with Nile Rodgers, Spectrum  and A Red Show in A represent the next stage in a truly international project of ever-growing artistic ambition and cultural resonance.

 

www.7x7project.com

www.jpmuller.be

Jean Pierre Muller is a Belgian Neo-pop artist who makes vibrant assemblages using high and low forms and techniques. In his work, photography, drawing, silk-screen and painting come together and gestural and mechanical interventions meet. His collaborations with musicians offer an interactivity to his paintings, giving his audience new participatory ways of entering his world. Jean Pierre is committed to both his art practice and his role as head of the Printmaking Department at La Cambre, one of Belgium’s leading schools of art and design. His work has been shown at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Saragossa, the Hanover World Fair, the Royal Festival Hall and, latterly, Summerhall as part of the Edinburgh Festival.

Robert Wyatt was a founding member of the Soft Machine, who along with Pink Floyd helped to transform the late sixties psychedelic scene in the UK into something more lasting. In his long and distinguished solo career, he has been mixing simple and effective keyboard melody lines with poignant lyrics, often filled with personal and political references. He’s simply the most beautiful voice in English music (5 to 6 octaves of range, each octave is of a totally different character), and the long list of his collaborators includes Jimi Hendrix, Mike Oldfield, Brian Eno, Björk, David Gilmour or Paul Weller.

NYSCA     Department of Cultural Affairs NYC

NO EXIT : A Project by Khaled Jarrar

Still from Khaled Jarrar's "I. Soldier"

Whitebox Art Center Presents

NO EXIT
A Project by Khaled Jarrar
On View July 24th – August 9th (extended)

Opening reception at Whitebox Art Center July 24th 5 – 7 pm

Link to images and press packet 

New York City – Whitebox Art Center presents a solo show by Palestinian artist Khaled Jarrar, produced and curated by Myriam Vanneschi.

The Israel Border Police denied artist Khaled Jarrar exit to travel to NYC for this project and his participation in the show Here and Elsewhere at the New Museum. He has since decided to create a new work for this show that deals with his status as well as the current situation in Gaza. This new media piece will be live updated as the situation develops.

Khaled Jarrar describes his experience attempting to leave Palestine on July 23rd, 2014: “Another massacre is taking place in Gaza, and Israel is trying to sell it as a war with Hamas using a deceptive media campaign, turning the oppressed into a villain. It is a fact that Israel is an occupying and apartheid country that controls our land, steals our water and natural resources, depriving us of our basic human rights for the past 66 years. The Israeli recurrent massacres will never end. Telling and sharing our stories and what is happening in Palestine is very essential. We are obliged to take the streets and strongly condemn the killing of the people of Gaza”.

NO EXIT is produced and curated by Myriam Vanneschi and co-produced by Igor Molochevski.
The programs of Whitebox Art Center are made possible in part by the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs.

Press Contact: press@whiteboxny.org

Links to Press:

ArtFCity: Weighing Risks After Last Weeks Cancelled Pro-Palestine Workshop by Whitney Kimball

WNYC RADIO: Art That Reaches Beyond Palestine by Deborah Solomon & Gisele Regatao

Hyperallergic: The Real Life Politics of Palestinian Art in New York by Hrag Vartanian

Artnet News: Pro-Palestine Exhibition Cancelled in NYC by Ben Davis

Hyperallergic: Israel Denies Exit for Palestinian Artist In New Museum Show by Myriam Vanneschi

Le Monde: Khaled Jarrar, artiste et militaire palestinien, n’ira pas à New York by Robin Braquet

Animal New York: Israel Denies Exit Palestinian Artist Bars Attending His New Museum Show by Marina Galperina

ArtNews: No Exit for Palestinian Artist Khaled Jarrar

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Here and elsewhere, at war, and into the future: Palestine

Live Web Stream panel discussion organized and moderated by Mohammad Salemy as part of the Fixing the Future Platform  Tuesday August 5, 2014, 6PM EST Hosted Live at Whitebox Art Center | 329 Broome St New York, NY 10002 Panelists:… Continue reading

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Liberation Art

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ArtPalestine International and Whitebox Art Center present

Liberation Art

Readings and Performance Thursday April 10th | 6:30-9pm

 

6:30 pm Samia Halaby signs her books.

7pm Samia Halaby reads Samia Halaby, Five Decades of Painting and Innovation by Maymanah Farhat published by Booth Clibborn Editions. She also reads select excerpts from Art of Palestine, A detailed study of Palestinian art during the second half of the twentieth century

7:45pm Special guest performance artist Elias Wakeem: video screening Borderline Drag Show and drag show lip-sync to Fairouz’s Can You See How Big the Sea Is?

8pm Alison Weir reads Against Our Better Judgment: The Hidden History of How the U.S. was Used to Create Israel

Samia Halaby: Five Decades of Painting and Innovation offers an unprecedented look at one of the world’s leading abstract painters. Spanning over five decades of the Palestinian artist’s illustrious career, from her early student days in the 1960s to her most recent series in 2013, the book contains nearly 450 colour reproductions, presenting her expansive oeuvre through paintings, prints, and drawings. These images are accompanied by an in-depth essay by art historian Maymanah Farhat in addition to the personal reflections of the artist on her theories of abstraction and the many inspirations and approaches that were involved in creating some of her most recognized works.

Samia A. Halaby is a Palestinian artist and scholar who lives and works in New York. Born in Jerusalem in 1936 during the British Mandate, today she is recognized as one of the Arab world’s leading contemporary painters. Halaby has also been active in American academia, teaching art at the university level for seventeen years, a decade of which was spent as an associate professor at the renowned Yale School of Art (1972–82) as the first woman ever to hold the position of associate professor. In addition to participating in leftist political organizing for various causes, she has long been an advocate of pro-Palestinian struggles.

Elias Wakeem also known as Madam Tayoush is an emerging queer arab Palestinian artist living and working in New York City. Through performance she examines the reaction of the audience to her personal story of the place she grew up in with its geographical, historical and political situations. Madam Tayoush created over the past few years a series of monthly radical queer drag ball parties in Jerusalem called “Jerusalem is Burning”.

Alison Weir’s new book Against Our Better Judgment: The Hidden History of How the U.S. was Used to Create Israel.  Alison Weir is a journalist, author and president of the “Council for the National Interest” as well as executive director of “If Americans Knew” a nonprofit organization dedicated to providing Americans with information on topics of importance that are misreported or under-reported in the American media.

See more about her book at Amazon

Book reading at  Whitebox Art Center    Samia Halaby, Five Decades...book cover sm

 

How Green Was My Valley – Artist talk

Whitebox Art Center

Center for Palestine Studies, Alwan for the Arts, ArtPalestine International and Whitebox Art Center present

How Green Was My Valley – Artist talk
Due to technical difficulties, the talk has been moved from Alwan For The Arts to Whitebox Art Center

Friday April 4th | 7:30pm
Joseph Audeh, Samira Badran & Mary Tuma | Moderated by Dr. Raouf J. Halaby

Free and open to the public
- Doors open at 6:30pm

Link to exhibition and press release
Link to Reading and Performance event
Link to Dr. Raouf J. Halaby’s article on Counter Punch

Joseph Audeh
(b. 1989, Sarasota, Florida)

Joseph Audeh currently lives and works in New York. His work engages architecture, environmental change, and technology. His various projects imagine solutions to meet future energy needs by combining old forms of environmental knowledge with breakthroughs in emerging technology. Audeh was selected as a Berkeley Design Fellow (2011), a finalist for the Frieze Writer’s Prize (2012), and a traveling artist for the River Has Two Banks at Makan Art Space, Amman (2012). He recently completed an artist residency at Townhouse Gallery, Cairo (2013).

Samira Badran
(b. 1954, Libya)

Samira Badran was born to Palestinian parents in Tripoli, Libya and currently lives and works in Barcelona. Her father, Islamic artist Jamal Badran influenced her practice, which uses a wide range of mediums including painting, collage, photography, and installation. She has exhibited at the Sharjah Biennial, Al Hoash—the Palestinian Art Court in Jerusalem, The UNESCO Palace in Paris, The Modern Art Gallery in Baghdad, the Jordanian National Gallery of Fine Arts in Amman, the Washington Museum of Women in the Arts, Musèe du Luxembourg, Paris, Centro Internazionale Multimedia, Italy, Gemeetemuseum den Haag, Foreign Ministry of Berlin, Al-Ma’mal Foundation, Jerusalem and Espai Agora, Barcelona.

Mary Tuma
(b. 1961, Oakland)

Mary Tuma was born in California in 1961 to a native Californian mother of Irish descent and a Palestinian father. She currently lives and works in Charlotte, North Carolina. She began sewing and crocheting with her mother at an early age. Her love of these processes led her to begin her formal study of art as an apprentice at Beautiful Arts Hall in Kerdassa, Egypt, where she learned to weave tapestries. Tuma’s work has been shown, nationally and internationally, in such venues as the Crocker Art Museum, The Maruki Gallery in Hiroshima, The Southeastern Center for Contemporary Art, Al-Kahf Gallery in Bethlehem, The Cheongju International Craft Biennial, the Station Museum in Houston and Contemporary Projects in Kuwait City. Her work has appeared in Contemporary Practices, Art in America, Dar Al-Hayat, The New York Times, The Christian Science Monitor, Counterpunch, NYArts, Mother Jones,The San Francisco Chronicle and The Jordan Star, among others.

Moderator – Raouf J. Halaby
(b. 1945, Jerusalem)

Raouf J. Halaby is a native of Jerusalem, Palestine. In 1959 he moved from Upper Bakaa to Beirut, Lebanon and graduated with honors from the National Protestant Secondary School in 1964. He was awarded a Bachelor and Master’s degrees from Ouachita Baptist University, and his Ed.D. in the College Teaching of English from Texas A&M University in 1973. He studied Art History in Rome, Italy.

Since 1973, he has been teaching at his alma mater and is in his 41st year as a Professor of English and Art. Halaby has served on national, regional and local boards, as a consultant for University of Minnesota’s Immigration History Research center. He is a widely-published author, a regular contributor to CounterPunch, a photographer, and an award-winning sculptor, whose works have been exhibited nationally. He is a peace activist dedicated to the cause of Palestine and her dispossessed people.

Thank you to the co-sponsors of the Artist Talk

Center for Palestine Studies, Alwan for the Arts, ArtPalestine International

alwan logo final 10-2013   cps logo blue (3)   ArtPalestineInternational_logo

How Green Was My Valley – Opening Celebration

Whitebox Art Center

ArtPalestine International and Whitebox Art Center present

How Green Was My Valley

On view April 3rd – 27th 2014
Opening celebration Thursday April 3rd | 6-8 pm
Readings and Performance Thursday April 10th | 5-7:30pm

Link to exhibition and press release
Link to Reading and Performance event

Mohamed Abusal | Tarek Al Ghoussein | Mohammed Al Hawajri | Joseph Audeh
Samira Badran | Taysir Batniji | Rana Bishara | Haitham Ennasr | Tanya Habjouqa
Wafa Hourani | Jeffar Khaldi | Mohammed Musallam | Larissa Sansour
Amer Shomali | Mary Tuma

Unveiled | Music – Performance – Readings

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Whitebox Art Center will host a multi-media event generated in collaboration with KafLab. Unveiled will combine music, performance, technology and readings. This response to cultural and political complexities in the Middle East— will take place on the closing of Beyond the Cloth: The Kafiye Project.

Music

Starting with acoustic and traditional Arab musical forms of the oud (Hadi Eldebek) and acoustic guitar (Plus Aziz) juxtaposing with an exploration of improvised drawing and experimental sound (Kevork Mourad) raw interaction of words and music hip hop/spoken word/postmodernist African American youth culture (organized and led by Chris Carr).

Performance

Ferrán Martín’s performative use of fire and wood — highlighting destruction as a process inherent to civilization— is an experience of transformation in time informed by rituals native to the Western Mediterranean Basin.

Rosalinda González’s musical performance of an original composition — for electric violin, mattress needles and cymbals— is inspired by female protesters in Egypt. The two-channel video projection ties into iconoclastic suppression of Christianity in the region.

Pasha Radetzki’s HUEWOMANITY in conjunction with the U.N. MOM Committee and its Digitala sub-committee explores the possibility of progress in contemporary children’s rights today — particularly in Syria.

Interactive installation by Igor Molochevski and Ella Averbukh — The Silent Prayer of Magnetic Field, for which Ella will create — in real-time— a canvas of yarn embedded with magnetic components following geometric patterns related to the Kafiye. A real-time analysis of the magnetic field generated by her movements will create musical composition.

Readings

Music and performances will be punctuated with live readings by Anthony Hayden-Guest’s referent to his days covering for the British Press the Civil War in Lebanon in relation to today’s situation. Erum Naqvi will introduce the event while providing a framework extrapolated from her writings on globalization and contemporary aesthetics.

Beyond the Cloth : “The Kafiye Project”

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WHITE BOX presents in collaboration with KAFLAB

 

Beyond the Cloth :

“The Kafiye Project”

 

An exhibition curated by Hala A. Malak

Sept. 6 – Sept. 29, 2013

Opening reception Sept. 8th  | 6 – 8pm

White Box Projects (lower level)

 

The Kafiye Project Event Dates

Sept. 6: VIP Opening + Meet the Artists+ Cake book launch 5.30-8pm

Sept. 29: Closing and Pop up store + Performances 3-7pm

 

Kaflab Social Media

https://www.facebook.com/kaflabfoundation

https://twitter.com/kaflab

www.kaflab.org